Education for sustainable development

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Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) was a United Nations program that defined as education that encourages changes in knowledge, skills, values and attitudes to enable a more sustainable and just society for all. ESD aims to empower and equip current and future generations to meet their needs using a balanced and integrated approach to the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. ESD is the term most used internationally and by the United Nations.[1] Agenda 21 was the first international document that identified education as an essential tool for achieving sustainable development and highlighted areas of action for education.

Concept and origin[edit]

One definition of Education for Sustainable Development is an "interdisciplinary learning methodology covering the integrated social, economic, and environmental aspects of formal and informal curriculum".[2] The Brundtland Commission defined sustainable development as meeting the needs of the present generation without putting at risk the capacity of generations to come in meeting their own requirements.[3] This Agency used to be the World Commission on Environment and Development created in 1983.[4] The idea of sustainable development originated from the United Nations Conference on Human Environment in Stockholm (Sweden 1972).[5] There were two more global activities since then. These were the United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development 1987 (Our Common Future Report)[6] and the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development 1992 (Rio Earth Summit).[7]

For UNESCO, education for sustainable development involves:

integrating key sustainable development issues into teaching and learning. This may include, for example, instruction about climate change, disaster risk reduction, biodiversity, and poverty reduction and sustainable consumption. It also requires participatory teaching and learning methods that motivate and empower learners to change their behaviours and take action for sustainable development. ESD consequently promotes competencies like critical thinking, imagining future scenarios and making decisions in a collaborative way.[8][9]


See also[edit]

Sources[edit]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "Untitled Document". Esdtoolkit.org. Retrieved 17 October 2017.
  2. ^ "Education for sustainable development | Higher Education Academy". www.heacademy.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018-07-04.
  3. ^ "The Brundtland Commission". www.sustainabledevelopment2015.org. Retrieved 2018-07-04.
  4. ^ "Education for Sustainable Development | Development". RESET.to. Retrieved 2018-07-04.
  5. ^ "UN Conference on the Human Environment .:. Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform". sustainabledevelopment.un.org. Retrieved 2018-07-04.
  6. ^ "UN World Commission on Environment and Development, ed., Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future | Environment & Society Portal". www.environmentandsociety.org. Retrieved 2018-07-04.
  7. ^ "The Rio Earth Summit: summary of the United Nations conference on Environment and Development (BP-317E)". publications.gc.ca. Retrieved 2018-07-04.
  8. ^ "Education for Sustainable Development". UNESCO. Retrieved 17 October 2017.
  9. ^ Marope, P.T.M; Chakroun, B.; Holmes, K.P. (2015). Unleashing the Potential: Transforming Technical and Vocational Education and Training (PDF). UNESCO. pp. 9, 23, 25–26. ISBN 978-92-3-100091-1.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Jones, P., Selby, D., Sterling, S. (2010) Sustainability Education: Perspectives and Practice Across Higher Education. Renouf Publishing.
  • Sims, G. D. (2007) Sustainability Education: where does it belong? Minnesota State University.
  • Li, Z., and Williams, M. (2006) Environmental and Geographical Education for Sustainability: cultural contexts. Nova Publishers.
  • Lang, J. (2007) How to Succeed with Education for Sustainability. Curriculum Corporation.

External links[edit]