Edward

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Edward
EdwardI-Cassell.jpg
Pronunciation/ˈɛdwərd/
Polish: [ˈedvart]
German: [ˈedvart]
GenderMale
Origin
Word/nameOld English: Ēadƿeard
Meaningead "Riches", "Prosperous" or "Fortune" and ƿeard "Guardian" or "Protector"
Other names
Related namesEduard, Édouard, Eduardo, Edvard, Eðvarðr, Eduardas, Edvardas, Eddie, Ed, Edd, Ned, Ted, Ward, Woody

Edward is an English given name. It is derived from the Anglo-Saxon form ÉᚪᛞǷᛠᚱᛞ (in Anglo-Saxon runic alphabet) or Éadƿeard (in Latin alphabet), composed of the elements ead "wealth, fortune; prosperous" and ƿeard "guardian, protector".

The term ƿeard is of Indo-European origin, appearing in Latin «vereor», Greek «οὖρος» (oûros).

History[edit]

The name Edward was very popular in Anglo-Saxon England, but the rule of the Norman and Plantagenet dynasties had effectively ended its use amongst the upper classes.[1] The popularity of the name was revived when Henry III named his firstborn son, the future Edward I, as part of his efforts to promote a cult around Edward the Confessor, for whom Henry had a deep admiration.[2]

Variant forms[edit]

The name has been adopted in the Iberian peninsula since the 15th century, due to Edward, King of Portugal, whose mother was English. The Spanish/Portuguese forms of the name are Eduardo and Duarte. Other variant forms include French Édouard, Italian Edoardo and Odoardo, German, Dutch, Czech and Romanian Eduard and Scandinavian Edvard.

Short forms include Ed, Eddy, Eddie, Ted, Teddy and Ned.

People called Edward[edit]

Medieval[edit]

Modern[edit]

Nobility[edit]

Politicians[edit]

Artists and intellectuals[edit]

Sports[edit]

Other people[edit]

People surnamed Edward[edit]

  • John Edward, professional name of John Edward McGee, Jr. (born 1969), American self-proclaimed psychic
  • Trevelyan Edward (1938–1995), Sri Lankan cricketer

Fictional characters[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jones, Dan (March 25, 2014). The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England. Penguin Books. p. 241. ISBN 0143124927.
  2. ^ Jones, Dan (March 25, 2014). The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England. Penguin Books. pp. 241–242. ISBN 0143124927.