Edward Burton (zoologist)

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Edward Burton
Born1790
Southampton, Hampshire, England
Died11 March 1867 (age 67)[1]
Burial placeBoxley, Kent
NationalityBritish
OccupationArmy surgeon, zoologist
Notable work
A Catalogue of the Collection of Mammalia and Birds in the Museum of the Army Medical Department at Fort Pitt, Chatham

Edward Burton FRS FLS (1790 – 11 March 1867) was a British Army surgeon and a zoologist. He was also a magistrate for Kent.

Life[edit]

Little is known of Burton's life. He may have studied at St. George's Hospital, London.[a][2] The earliest record of his military career is in 1813, when he was attached to the 12th Foot, and was promoted from Hospital-Mate to Assistant-Surgeon.[3] In 1818, he transferred between units.[4] In 1826, he was attached to the 9th Light Dragoons, and was promoted Surgeon to the Forces.[5] In 1837, he retired on half-pay.[6]

Burton was stationed at Fort Pitt, Chatham from 1829 to 1837.[7] In 1838, he compiled A Catalogue of the Collection of Mammalia and Birds in the Museum of the Army Medical Department at Fort Pitt, Chatham.[8] He wrote in its Preface, "This task has been undertaken at such broken and uncertain periods as his professional duties left at the disposal of its author".

He described several species of bird, for some of which he is the valid binomial authority.[9]

Burton may have been the author of an 1821 paper relating to Pelecanus aquilus Linn.[b] on Ascension Island.[10] He has been identified as the man who in 1835 displayed a specimen of a species of Ratelus [c] at the Zoological Society of London.[7][11] He has also been identified as the man who in 1836 communicated a description of Pipra squalida,[d] a Himalayan flowerpecker, to the Zoological Society.[12]

Legacy[edit]

Three species have been named in Burton's honour: a bird, the spectacled finch (Callacanthis burtoni );[13][14] and two lizards, Burton's legless lizard (Lialis burtonis) and Burton's nessia (Nessia burtonii ).[15] A fourth species may have been named in his honour: a mammal, Burton's gerbil (Gerbillus burtoni ).[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Manuscript notes made at St George's Hospital in 1807 by an Edward Burton have been preserved in Royal Army Medical Corps records.[2]
  2. ^ Ascension frigatebird, Fregata aquila.
  3. ^ Perhaps the honey badger Mellivora capensis indica (Indian ratel).
  4. ^ Thick-billed flowerpecker, Dicaeum agile.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Deaths". The Gentleman's Magazine and Historical Review: 549. April 1867. Retrieved 18 July 2017.
  2. ^ a b "RAMC/295. Edward Burton's ms notes on the lectures on anatomy and surgery given at St. George's Hospital (London) by Everard Home. Vol. 1". Wellcome Trust. 1807. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  3. ^ "No. 16697". The London Gazette. 23 January 1813. p. 187.
  4. ^ "No. 17386". The London Gazette. 8 August 1818. p. 1415.
  5. ^ "No. 18256". The London Gazette. 10 June 1826. p. 1400.
  6. ^ "No. 19541". The London Gazette. 15 September 1837. p. 2427.
  7. ^ a b c Beolens, Bo; Watkins, Michael; Grayson, Michael (7 October 2009). "Burton, E.". The Eponym Dictionary of Mammals. Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 66. ISBN 9780801895333. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  8. ^ "A Catalogue of the Collection of Mammalia and Birds in the Museum of the Army Medical Department at Fort Pitt, Chatham". archive.org. 1838. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  9. ^ "Taxon author: Burton, 1836". ITIS. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  10. ^ "Observations on the Natural History and Anatomy of Pelecanus Aquilus of Linnaeus". The Transactions of the Linnean Society of London. XIII Part I. 1821. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  11. ^ "Mr. Burton, at the request of the Chairman, placed upon the table a specimen of a species of Ratelus". Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. 3: 113. 11 August 1835. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  12. ^ "Communication from Mr. Edward Burton". Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London: 113. 22 November 1836. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  13. ^ Jobling, James A. (31 January 2010). Helm Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names. A&C Black. p. 81. ISBN 9781408128787. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  14. ^ Beolens, Bo; Watkins, Michael; Grayson, Michael (28 August 2014). "Burton, E.". The Eponym Dictionary of Birds. Bloomsbury Publishing. ISBN 9781472905741. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  15. ^ Beolens, Bo; Watkins, Michael; Grayson, Michael (26 July 2011). "Burton, E.". The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles. Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 43. ISBN 9781421401355. Retrieved 19 November 2016.