Edward Curtis Franklin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Edward Curtis Franklin
Born (1862-03-01)March 1, 1862
Died February 13, 1937 (1937-02-14) (aged 74)
Nationality United States
Alma mater University of Kansas
Johns Hopkins University
Notable awards Willard Gibbs Award (1932)

Edward Curtis Franklin (March 1, 1862 – February 13, 1937) was an American chemist.

Biography[edit]

Edward Franklin was born in Geary, Kansas. He entered the University of Kansas at the age of 22, obtaining his major in chemistry in 1888. Two years later he decided to study at the University of Berlin for one year, but abandon it by 1891. In 1892 he came back to State University where he remained till 1893 working as assistant chemist. He graduated from Johns Hopkins University where he received his doctorate in chemistry a year later. He then came back to University of Kansas where he spent one year as a chemist while the rest of the years he was an associate professor there. He also worked as associate manager for a mining project in Costa Rica where he remained till he was informed about coming to Stanford University in 1903. From 1911 to 1913 he served as chief of the Division of Chemistry of the Public Health Service in Washington state. As life went by, he started to receive honours from home and abroad including Nichols and Willard Gibbs Awards. He was elected as a president of the American Chemical Society and became a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. Franklin got invited to participate at the British Association for the Advancement of Science at Melbourne, Australia, and Johannesburg, South Africa.[2] He died on February 13, 1937 from coronary thrombosis.[1]

Siblings[edit]

  • William Suddards Franklin
  • Nelle Franklin
  • Joseph Franklin
  • Thomas Z. Franklin[1]

Children[edit]

  • Anna Comstock Franklin
  • Peter Charles Scott Franklin
  • John Curtis Franklin I[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Edward Curtis Franklin I". King Mixers. Archived from the original on October 29, 2013. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Biography" (PDF). Retrieved June 16, 2013. 

Further reading[edit]