Edward Salia

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Hon.
Edward Kojo Salia
Member of Parliament
for Jirapa
In office
7 January 2001 – 16 February 2009
Preceded by Francis G. Korbieh
Succeeded by Francis Bawaana Dakurah
Majority 12,636
Personal details
Born 20 June 1952
Amasaman, Ghana
Died February 16, 2009(2009-02-16) (aged 56)
Accra, Ghana
Nationality Ghanaian
Political party National Democratic Congress
Children 4
Alma mater University of Ghana

Edward Kojo Salia (20 June 1952 – 16 February 2009) was a Ghanaian Member of Parliament. He was also a member of the National Democratic Congress and was a Minister of State in the Rawlings government.

Early life and education[edit]

Salia was born at Amasaman in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. His parents were Bajeluru Dorcie Salia, a farmer and Habiba Yiringsaa, a housewife. He attended the University of Ghana at Legon. He also attended the Institute of Social Studies at The Hague in the Netherlands. He also studied at the Carleton University in Ontario, Canada and Ottawa University . Between 2005 and 2007, he studied at the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration at Achimota in Accra.

Politics[edit]

Salia was appointed Minister of Transport and Communications in the Rawlings government in 1993. He also served as Minister for Mines and Energy and later for Roads and Transport in Jerry Rawlings's government. He was first elected as the member of parliament for the Jirapa in the 2000 election and he retained his seat in the two subsequent elections in 2004 and 2008.

External links and sources[edit]

Parliament of Ghana
Preceded by
Francis G. Korbieh
Member of Parliament for Jirapa
2001 - 2009
Succeeded by
Francis Bawaana Dakurah
Political offices
Preceded by
Minister for Transport and Communications
1993 - 1995
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Richard Kwame Peprah
Minister for Mines and Energy
1995 -
Succeeded by
Fred Ohene-Kena
Preceded by
Minister for Roads and Transport
- 2001
Succeeded by
Felix Owusu-Adjapong
(Minister for Transport and Communications)