Edward Strong

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Edward W. Strong
Born(1901-10-16)October 16, 1901
DiedJanuary 13, 1990 (aged 88)
Known forFree Speech Movement
Scientific career
FieldsPhilosopher and Administrator
InstitutionsUniversity of California, Berkeley

Edward William Strong (October 16, 1901 - January 13, 1990)[1][2] was the Chancellor of the University of California at Berkeley between 1961 and 1965.[3] He resigned in March 1965, in large part due to his actions during the Free Speech Movement, which was beginning at that time.[3] Besides his role as chancellor, Strong founded UC Berkeley's Department of Sociology and Social Institutions in 1946, chaired it until 1953, as well as in another of other campus roles.[3]

Early life and education[edit]

Edward Strong graduated from Stanford University in 1925, and went on to receive a master's and doctorate in philosophy from Columbia University in 1929 and 1937, respectively.[3]

Career[edit]

Edward Strong first joined the faculty at UC Berkeley in 1932 as a lecturer, before being promoted to full professor in 1947.[3] He founded Berkeley's Department of Sociology and Social Institutions in 1946, and chaired it until 1953.[3] Strong also served for most of this period as an associate dean of the College of Letters and Science.[3] He was appointed a Vice-Chancellor in 1958, and became Chancellor of the University of California at Berkeley, a role he served between 1961 and 1965.[3] While Strong was Chancellor, he helped contribute to the establishment of Berkeley's Department of Computer Science.[3] He resigned in March 1965, in large part due to his actions during the Free Speech Movement, which was beginning at that time.[3] After his resignation as Chancellor, Strong was appointed to the Mills Professorship of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy and Civil Polity, where he taught until 1967, when he retired.[3] Besides for his academic work, Strong was once president of the American Philosophical Association, and was the primary founder of the Journal of the History of the Philosophy.[3] He was also instrumental in the construction of the Radiation Laboratory on Charter Hill, which morphed in to the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, which later participated in significant research into nuclear weapons.[3]

Controversy as Chancellor[edit]

Strong's tenure as Chancellor at Berkeley was marked by strife related to the free speech movement, leading to his resignation in March 1965.[3] When Strong resigned he issued a statement blaming Clark Kerr (who had resigned previously) for "capitulating to the tide of revolt, subversive of law and order."[4] While acting as Chancellor, Strong favored harsh disciplinary policies, and was upset that Clark Kerr had made certain concessions to the "student rebels" involved in the Free Speech Movement.[4]

Strong's actions during the Free Speech Movement were harshly criticized by some students and faculty members for the approach he took to free speech activity on campus.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Uncorrected Papers: Diverse Philosophical Dissents". Wallace Matson. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  2. ^ "Edward W. Strong, Sociology and Social Institutions; Philosophy: Berkeley". University of California. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Days of Cal | Edward W. Strong". University of California. Retrieved 21 September 2013.
  4. ^ a b "Resigned U of C Chief Under Fire". Toledo Blade. March 12, 1965.
  5. ^ "Berkeley Chancellor Out; U. Cal Outlook Muddled". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Jan 4, 1965.