Edward W. Pattison

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Ned Pattison, Congressman from New York

Edward Worthington Pattison (April 29, 1932 – August 22, 1990) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from New York.

Biography[edit]

"Ned" Pattison was born in Troy, New York on April 29, 1932. He graduated from Cornell University in 1953, and served in the United States Army from 1954 until 1956. He received a law degree from Cornell Law School in 1957 and practiced in Troy.

He served as Rensselaer County Treasurer from 1970 until 1975. Pattison unsuccessfully ran for Congress in 1970 against Carleton J. King, and for Rensselaer County Executive in 1973.

Pattison was elected to Congress in 1974 as a post-Watergate Democrat [1] in a predominantly Republican district and served from January 3, 1975 until January 3, 1979. While a Member of the House of Representatives, he first served on the House Committee on the Judiciary, where as a freshman Representative, he played a key role in the reform of the national copyright law. During his second term, he served on the House Banking Committee. He lost a bid for re-election in 1978 against Gerald B. H. Solomon.

After leaving Congress Pattison returned to practicing law, and also worked as a political commentator on local television and radio.

He died in West Sand Lake, New York and was buried in Troy's Oakwood Cemetery.[2]

Pattison's son, Mark was elected Mayor of Troy in 1995 and re-elected in 1999. Members of the Pattison family continue to be active in local politics.

The government center for Rensselaer County is named for him.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ken Rudin, National Public Radio, The Watergate Class Of 1974: How They Arrived In Congress, How They Left, June 19, 2012
  2. ^ Joan Cook, New York Times, Edward Pattison, 58, Former Congressman And Lawyer in Troy, August 24, 1990

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Carleton J. King
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 29th congressional district

1975–1979
Succeeded by
Gerald B. H. Solomon