Edward W. Wynkoop

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Edward W. Wynkoop, in Denver, Colorado Territory, Appx. 1865

Edward Wanshear Wynkoop (1836-1891) was a founder of the city of Denver, Colorado. Wynkoop Street in Denver is named after him.

Wynkoop served as an officer in the First Colorado Volunteer Cavalry during the American Civil War, attaining the rank of major of volunteers, and was brevetted a lieutenant colonel in May 1865. During a period as post commander at Fort Lyon, Colorado in 1864, Wynkoop encouraged peace efforts with the Cheyenne, but was transferred in November 1864 to Fort Riley, Kansas, where he was posted at the time of the Sand Creek massacre. On behalf of the U.S. Army he investigated Col. John M. Chivington's conduct at Sand Creek, which led to Chivington's condemnation.

In 1866, Wynkoop became an Indian agent for the Southern Cheyennes and Arapaho, resigning in December 1868 in protest of the destruction of Black Kettle's village in the Battle of Washita River.[1] He later became warden of the New Mexico penitentiary and died in Santa Fe on September 11, 1891.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The New York Times Report of Col. Wynkoop
  2. ^ Hardorff 2006, p. 45 note 1.

References[edit]

  • Hardorff, Richard G., compiler & editor (2006). Washita Memories: Eyewitness Views of Custer's Attack on Black Kettle's Village. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-3759-2.
  • Kraft, Louis, (2011). Ned Wynkoop and the Lonely Road from Sand Creek. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0-8061-4226-5