Edwin A. Dawes

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Edwin A. Dawes
Born (1925-07-06) 6 July 1925 (age 95)
NationalityEnglish
Other namesEddie Dawes
OccupationBiochemist, magician
Years active1947-present
Notable work
Quantitative Problems in Biochemistry; Microbial Energetics

Edwin Alfred Dawes (born 6 July 1925) is a biochemist and magician from Yorkshire, England. As a biochemist, he authored two textbooks and was the long-term and founding head of the Biochemistry department at the University of Hull, where he led its research into bioplastics. As a magician, he is an internationally recognised authority on the history of magic.

Early life and education[edit]

Dawes was born in Goole in the West Riding of Yorkshire on 6 July 1925.[1] He developed an interest in magic at the age of 5 when his father and grandfather performed for him during a period of illness. His interest in chemistry developed while at grammar school in Goole, and when he received a gas-mask during World War 2, he decided to test it by producing chlorine gas in the family shed.[2]

He completed his Bachelor of Science with Honours at the University of Leeds in 1946, and his PhD in 1948.[1]

Academic career[edit]

Dawes lectured at the University of Leeds from 1947 to 1950, and at the University of Glasgow from 1951 to 1963. In 1963, he founded the University of Hull's Biochemistry department, and headed it until 1986. From 1963 to 1990 he was Hull's Reckitt Professor of Biochemistry. As director of Hull's biomedical research unit from 1981 to 1992, he led its work on polyhydroxyalkanoate bioplastics, which led to the commercialisation of Biopol by ICI.[2][1][3]

He was Hull's Dean of Science from 1968 to 1970, and its pro-vice-chancellor from 1977 to 1980.[4] Dawes was granted emeritus status in 1990,[3] and awarded an honorary Doctorate of Science by the university in 1992.[5][2]

Dawes was an editor of the Biochemical Journal from 1958 to 1965 and the Journal of General Microbiology from 1971 to 1976, and served as editor-in-chief of the latter between 1976 and 1981.[6] In 1981 he became Publications Manager of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies, and the following year commenced as Chief Editor of its FEMS Microbiology Letters journal. He retired from those positions in 1990, and subsequently became the society's archivist.[7]

Dawes with the Philip Larkin Society in 2011

Dawes has been chairman of the Philip Larkin Society since its founding in 1995, ten years after the death of the poet. The two became friends while Larkin was librarian at the university's Brynmor Jones Library and Dawes was Chairman of the Library Committee (1974 to 1987).[8] On 2 December 2016, after a long campaign, Larkin's memorial was unveiled at Poet's Corner in Westminster Abbey by Dawes and Anthony Thwaite (the Society's president).[9][10]

Works[edit]

Dawes's 1956 textbook Quantitative Problems in Biochemistry was translated into 6 languages, and as of 2016 remained in print in Japan.[2] Reviews of its 1972 5th edition noted that it had "become a classic for many honours students and teachers of bio-chemistry"[11] with its text "outstanding for being concise yet clear.[12] Its 1980 6th edition was considered as "disappointing" by two reviewers due to its abbreviated content and insufficient coverage of developments in the field,[13][14] however another reviewer would recommend it without hesitation "as a valuable teaching and reference resource".[15]

His 1986 textbook Microbial Energetics was aimed at the advanced undergraduate, with chapters on "microbial reserve compounds analogous to starch and glycogen of higher cells" deemed "especially authoritative and up-to-date",[16] and with a writing style which "affords considerable pleasure simply by the manner in which the material is presented".[17]

Magic[edit]

Dawes was President of the Scottish Conjurers' Association from 1959 to 1963, and edited its magazine from 1958 to 1962.[18] Dawes also edited the magazine for the Scottish Association of Magical Societies (SAMS), the national organisation for magical clubs in Scotland.[19] He is President of the Hull Magicians Circle,[20] and historian for The Magic Circle.[21]

Dawes is a multi-award-winning historian of magic, and is likely to have been the most prolific.[5] His writings, which have been noted for consistently excellent scholarship and engaging prose,[5] include The Great Illusionists,[22] The Encyclopedia of Magic with Arthur Setterington,[23] a number of monographs, and hundreds of articles including (since 1972) his long-running "A Rich Cabinet of Magical Curiosities" monthly column in The Magic Circular.[5]

With Amy Dawes[edit]

In magic shows, his wife Amy (née Rogerson[3]) performed both as his assistant and in her own right.[2] She was a domestic science student during his studies at Leeds, and subsequently became a teacher in Glasgow.[2] They married on 19 December 1950, and had two sons. The couple developed Only Make-Believe: A Plethora of Prestidigitation, an award-winning stage show, in which they performed as Professor Bluffman and Madame Patrice.[24] Amy Dawes died on 30 December 2014, aged 85.[25][2]

Awards and honours[edit]

  • 2017 – Gold Medal from The Magic Circle for "exemplary service to the Society or exceptional magical ability or both". Dawes was only the ninth recipient since 1926.[26]
  • 2016 – Special Fellowship from the Academy of Magical Arts.[27]
  • 2010 – John Nevil Maskelyne Prize (with Steve Short) from the Magic Circle for Entertainer with the Magic Touch about David Nixon.[28]
  • 2010 – the Edwin A. Dawes Award for Magic Scholarship was created by The Magic Collectors Association.[29]
  • 2006 – FISM award for History and Research.[5]
  • 2005 – John Nevil Maskelyne Prize (with Michael Bailey) for Circle Without End about The Magic Circle.[30]
  • 2002 – David Devant Award from the Magic Circle for advancing the art of magic or providing outstanding service to magic internationally.[31]
  • 1998 – Maskelyne Award from the Magic Circle "for services to British magic".[32]
  • 1996 – made Honorary President of the Scottish Association of Magical Societies.[19]
  • 1988 – John Nevil Maskelyne Prize for "noteworthy contributions... to the art or literature of magic".[33]
  • 1984 – Society of American Magicians Hall of Fame.[34]
  • 1984 – Literary Fellowship from the Academy of Magical Arts.[27]
  • 1975 – made Honorary Vice President of the Magic Circle.[35]
  • 1974 – made Honorary Life President of the Scottish Conjurers Association.[18]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Kay, Ernest (1987). International Who's who in Education. International Biographical Centre. p. 135. ISBN 9780900332876. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Venn - University of Hull magazine". issuu. pp. 32–35. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b c Men of Achievement 93-94 (15 ed.). Taylor & Francis. 1993. p. 197. ISBN 9780948875755. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ Who's who in science in Europe. F. Hodgson. September 1984. ISBN 9780582901094. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ a b c d e "The Edwin A. Dawes Award for Magic Scholarship". www.magicana.com. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Medical Sciences International Who's who. Longman. 1990. p. 246. ISBN 9780582041936. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "Professor E.A. Dawes". FEMS Microbiology Letters. 77: iii. 1 January 1991. doi:10.1111/j.1574-6968.1991.tb04311.x. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Goodman, Richard (June 1999). "My Particular Talents". Humanities Collections. 1 (2): 45–60. doi:10.1300/J139v01n02_07.
  9. ^ "Memorial to Philip Larkin unveiled in Poets' Corner". BT.com. 2 December 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ Sawer, Patrick (30 November 2016). "'Outsider' Larkin finally joins the Establishment in Poets' Corner". The Telegraph. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ Billing, Barbara H. (1973). "Quantitative Problems in Biochemistry". Journal of Clinical Pathology. 26 (6): 461. doi:10.1136/jcp.26.6.461-a. ISSN 0021-9746. PMC 477790.
  12. ^ Herries, D.G. (September 1972). "Quantitative problems in biochemistry". Biochemical Education. 1 (1): 13. doi:10.1016/0307-4412(72)90016-7.
  13. ^ Easterby, JS (July 1981). "Quantitative problems in biochemistry (Sixth Edition)". Biochemical Education. 9 (3): 112. doi:10.1016/0307-4412(81)90228-4.
  14. ^ PRICE, N. C. (1 August 1981). "Quantitative Problems in Biochemistry (6th Edition)". Biochemical Society Transactions. 9 (4): 359.2–359. doi:10.1042/bst0090359a.
  15. ^ Kell, Douglas (21 December 1981). "Quantitative Problems in Biochemistry (Sixth Edition)". FEBS Letters. 136 (1): 181. doi:10.1016/0014-5793(81)81241-0.
  16. ^ Poole, Robert K. (1 October 1986). "Microbial Energetics". Biochemical Society Transactions. 14 (5): 991.2–991. doi:10.1042/bst0140991a.
  17. ^ Battley, Edwin H. (June 1987). "Microbial Energetics. Edwin A. Dawes". The Quarterly Review of Biology. 62 (2): 191. doi:10.1086/415438.
  18. ^ a b "Scottish Conjurers' Association". www.scamagic.org. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  19. ^ a b "History of the Scottish Association of Magical Societies". www.paisleymagiccircle.co.uk. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  20. ^ "HMC History". www.hullmc.org.uk. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  21. ^ McDonald, Lucy (10 April 2007). "And that's renaissance magic ..." The Guardian. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  22. ^ Dawes, Edwin A. (Edwin Alfred). "The great illusionists / Edwin A. Dawes". National Library of Australia. David & Charles. Retrieved 13 February 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  23. ^ The encyclopedia of magic. OCLC 14871446.
  24. ^ "In Memoriam Amy Dawes". Linking Ring (15 Apr ed.). p. 40.[verification needed].
  25. ^ "Hull Magicians' Circle". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)[better source needed]
  26. ^ Herrick, Mark. "The Magic Circle Awards 2017". themagiccircle.co.uk. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  27. ^ a b "Hall of Fame | The Academy of Magical Arts". www.magiccastle.com. Retrieved 13 February 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  28. ^ "Awards 2010". tmclists.co.uk. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  29. ^ "Edwin A. Dawes Award for Magic Scholarship". The Magic Circular: 258. September 2010.
  30. ^ "0284 - MagicWeek UK Magic News". www.magicweek.co.uk. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  31. ^ Brennan, Andrew. "The Magic Circle, David Devant award". themagiccircle.co.uk. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  32. ^ Brennan, Andrew. "The Magic Circle Maskelyne Award". themagiccircle.co.uk. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  33. ^ Brennan, Andrew. "The John Nevil Maskelyne Prize". themagiccircle.co.uk. Retrieved 1 January 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  34. ^ "The Hall". Society of American Magicians Hall of Fame and Magic Museum, Inc. 3 November 2011. Retrieved 13 February 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  35. ^ "Hull Magicians' Circle". Goodliffe's Abracadabra. Vol. 60 no. 1555. 15 November 1975. p. 387.