Efinaconazole

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Efinaconazole
Efinaconazole.svg
Clinical data
Trade namesJublia, Clenafin
License data
Routes of
administration
Topical (solution)
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
BioavailabilityUnknown (oral)
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
KEGG
ChEBI
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.245.862 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC18H22F2N4O
Molar mass348.39 g/mol g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

Efinaconazole (trade names Jublia and Clenafin) is a triazole antifungal. It is approved for use in Canada, Japan and the United States as a 10% topical solution for the treatment of onychomycosis (fungal infection of the nail).[1][2] Efinaconazole acts as a 14α-demethylase inhibitor.[3][4]

Medical uses[edit]

In two clinical trials 17.8% and 15.2% of patients using efinaconazole were cured, compared to 3.3% and 5.5% of patients using a placebo.[4]

Efinaconazole is not especially effective, but it is currently the best topical treatment available, with cure rates two or three times better than the next best topical treatment, ciclopirox. It is considered a reasonable option for patients with mild cases, or patients who can not take oral treatment.[5]

History[edit]

In 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the New Drug Application (NDA).[6] According to Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc CEO J. Michael Pearson they acquired Jublia through their purchase of Dow Pharmaceutical Sciences in 2008.[6]

Cost[edit]

In 2015 the cost of treatment with efinaconazole in the United States was said to be $2317 per nail.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Patel T, Dhillon S (Nov 2013). "Efinaconazole: first global approval". Drugs. 73 (17): 1977–1983. doi:10.1007/s40265-013-0152-x. PMID 24249649.
  2. ^ Tschen EH, Bucko AD, Oizumi N, Kawabata H, Olin JT, Pillai R (Feb 2013). "Efinaconazole solution in the treatment of toenail onychomycosis: a phase 2, multicenter, randomized, double-blind study". J Drugs Dermatol. 12 (2): 186–192. PMID 23377392.
  3. ^ Tatsumi Y, Nagashima M, Shibanushi T, et al. (May 2013). "Mechanism of action of efinaconazole, a novel triazole antifungal agent". Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 57 (5): 2405–2509. doi:10.1128/aac.02063-12. PMC 3632939.
  4. ^ a b "Drugs at FDA: JUBLIA" (PDF). Retrieved 26 June 2014.
  5. ^ "A Closer Look At A New Topical Option For Onychomycosis". Retrieved 21 May 2015.
  6. ^ a b "Valeant Pharmaceuticals Announces FDA Approval Of Jublia® for the Treatment of Onychomycosis". Valeant Pharmaceuticals. Laval, Quebec. 9 June 2014. Retrieved 1 November 2015.
  7. ^ Mikailov A, Cohen J, Joyce C, Mostaghimi A (2015). "Cost-effectiveness of Confirmatory Testing Before Treatment of Onychomycosis". JAMA Dermatology: 1–6. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.4190. PMID 26716567.