Egyptian protest law

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Egyptian protest law (act 107, year 2013)[1][2] was signed into law on 24 November 2013 by former president Adly Mansour.[3] The law requires three days notification before protesting; in addition, the Interior Ministry has the right to "cancel, postpone or move" the protest if it determines that protesters will "breach ... the law".[4]

The April 6 Youth Movement, Tamarod and the Strong Egypt Party all criticized the law on the day it was passed.[5] Former presidential candidate Khaled Ali challenged the protest law in court on 17 June 2014, though the case was adjourned until 21 October 2014.[6] Though there were indications in early September 2014 that the protest law would be amended,[7] this ultimately did not happen.[8]

A group of female protesters, including some as young as 15, were sentenced to terms ranging from being held until they are 18 (in the case of the minors) to 11 years in prison (in the case of the older defendants).[9] Human rights groups and other criticized the verdict.[10] The minors were acquitted upon appeal, while the other female protesters were given a suspended sentence of one year.[11] One of the founders of the April 6 Youth Movement, Ahmed Maher, joined a hunger strike held by other prisoners and their supporters to pressure authorities to abrograte the protest law and release prisoners.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ constitutionnet.org, Egypt: Law No.107 for 2013 For organizing the right to peaceful public meetings, processions and protests
  2. ^ Arabic Wikisource, full text of the act in arabic
  3. ^ "Interim President Adly Mansour signs controversial protests law". Egypt Independent. 24 November 2013. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  4. ^ "9 protesters sentenced to prison for violating protest law". Aswat Masriya. 30 September 2014. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  5. ^ "Opponents to new protest law vow to fight tooth and nail". Egypt Independent. 24 November 2013. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  6. ^ "Court allows prominent lawyer to challenge protest law". Egypt Independent. 17 June 2014. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  7. ^ "Egypt's protest law to be amended: NCHR member". Ahram Online. 8 September 2014. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  8. ^ "Egypt government reneges on amending protest law". Ahram Online. 18 September 2014. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  9. ^ "Egypt: Heavy prison sentence for Islamist women". AP. 27 November 2013. Archived from the original on 6 October 2014. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  10. ^ "Severe sentences for Alexandria female protesters spark Egypt outcry". Ahram Online. 28 November 2013. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  11. ^ "Appeals court reduces sentence of Islamist female protesters". Ahram Online. 7 December 2013. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 
  12. ^ "April 6 founder Ahmed Maher joins hunger strike". Ahram Online. 16 September 2014. Retrieved 30 September 2014. 

External links[edit]