Ein Mahil

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Ein Mahil
  • עֵין מָהִל, עין מאהל
  • عين ماهل
Hebrew transcription(s)
 • ISO 259 ʕein Máhel
Ein Mahel.jpg
Ein Mahil is located in Israel
Ein Mahil
Ein Mahil
Coordinates: 32°43′22.87″N 35°21′7.84″E / 32.7230194°N 35.3521778°E / 32.7230194; 35.3521778Coordinates: 32°43′22.87″N 35°21′7.84″E / 32.7230194°N 35.3521778°E / 32.7230194; 35.3521778
Grid position 183/236 PAL
District Northern
Government
 • Type Local council (from 1964)
Area
 • Total 5,203 dunams (5.203 km2 or 2.009 sq mi)
Population (2015)[1]
 • Total 12,484
Name meaning "The spring of the barren land."[2]

Ein Mahil (Arabic: عين ماهل‎‎; Hebrew: עֵין מָהִל‎) is an Arab local council in the Northern District of Israel, located about five kilometers north-east of Nazareth. It was declared a local council in 1964. In 2015 it had a population of 12,484, the majority of which are Muslims.

History[edit]

In 1596, Ein Mahil appeared in Ottoman tax registers as being in the Nahiya of Tabariyya of the Liwa of Safad. It had a population of 28 Muslim households, and paid taxes on wheat, barley, fruit trees, and goats or beehives.[3] A map by Pierre Jacotin, from 1799 showed the place named Ain el Mahel.[4]

The French explorer Victor Guérin passed by the village in the 1875, and described it as having 10 poor dwellings, surrounded by gardens of olives, figs and pomegranates.[5] In 1881 the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) described it as a "Stone village, situated on very high ground, surrounded by figs and olives and arable land. It contains about 200 Moslems, and has near it a fine group of springs."[6]

In a census conducted in 1922 by the British Mandate authorities, 'Ain Mahel had a population of 516, all Muslims.[7] The population increased in the 1931 census of Palestine to 628, of whom 1 was Christian and the rest Muslims, in a total of 109 occupied houses.[8]

In 1945 the population was 1,040, all Arabs, with 13,390 dunams of land, according to an official land and population survey.[9] Of this, 1,486 dunams were for plantations and irrigable land, 6,748 for cereals,[10] while 35 dunams were built-up land.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of localities, in Alphabetical order" (PDF). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved 16 October 2016. 
  2. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 122
  3. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 189
  4. ^ Karmon, 1960, p. 167
  5. ^ Guérin, 1880, p. 382
  6. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 362
  7. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-district of Nazareth, p. 38
  8. ^ Mills, 1932, p.73
  9. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 62
  10. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 109
  11. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 159

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]