El Paso Streetcar

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El Paso Streetcar
Overview
Type Streetcar
Status Under construction
Locale El Paso, Texas, U.S.
Stations 27 stops[1]
Operation
Planned opening Late 2018[1]
Operator(s) Sun Metro
Rolling stock 6 refurbished PCC streetcars
Technical
Line length 4.8 mi (7.7 km) (round trip)
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
Route diagram

Baltimore & Mesa
Don Haskins Center
Stanton & Cincinnati
UTEP
Oregon & University
Stanton & Kerbey
Children's Hospital
Oregon & Rim
Stanton & Rim
Oregon & River
Stanton & California
Oregon & Rio Grande
Stanton & Arizona
Oregon & Yandell
Stanton & Yandell
Oregon & Missouri
Stanton & Missouri
Franklin & El Paso
Franklin & Mesa
Amtrak
to Union Depot
Amtrak
Santa Fe & Mills
Kansas & Mills
Santa Fe & Overland
Kansas & San Antonio
Paisano Drive
Kansas & 1st
Maintenance
Facility
Santa Fe & 4th
Father Rahm & El Paso
Father Rahm & Stanton

The El Paso Streetcar is a streetcar system in El Paso, Texas, projected to cost $97 million.[1] It is slated to run 4.8 miles (7.7 km)[1][2] in two loops from Downtown El Paso to University of Texas at El Paso. The system is being constructed under the authority of the Camino Real Regional Mobility Authority but is planned to be operated by Sun Metro when completed.

History[edit]

On June 5, 2012, the city council unveiled a new route, creating a narrow loop for the service; streetcars will travel north on Stanton Street, turn left at Glory Road/Baltimore, then south on Oregon Street. A downtown loop will travel east on Franklin Avenue, south on Kansas Street, west on Father Rahm, and north on Santa Fe Street.[3] The El Paso City Council approved going forward with the project in July 2014.[4]

Construction began in late December 2015.[1] In November 2016, the city disclosed that construction funds had been extorted in a phishing scam perpetrated by an entity posing as a contractor – most of the funds had been recovered by the time it was publicly announced.[5]

Rolling stock[edit]

A streetcar on the former El Paso–Juárez streetcar line in the 1960s

City officials expressed their desire to preserve the history of El Paso by refurbishing the old PCC streetcars that once made their way through Downtown from 1949 to 1974.[6] The city had about eight streetcars, which were stored in a desert area at the El Paso International Airport.[7] These cars were originally manufactured in 1937 for service in San Diego, California.[8] The estimated cost to restore one vehicle was between $1.6 million and $2.5 million, compared with a price of about $1.2 million for a new replica streetcar.[citation needed]

Work to restore six cars to operating condition began in 2015 and is being carried out by Brookville Equipment Corporation. The cars will be painted in the livery used by the previous El Paso streetcar system from the 1950s until its closure in the 1970s.[8]

See also[edit]

Overhead electric infrastructure and rails for the under-construction El Paso Streetcar system at the University/Oregon stop, with pedestrians, December, 2017

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Ramirez, Cindy (September 23, 2016). "Streetcar work remains on time, budget". El Paso Times. Retrieved 2016-12-14.
  2. ^ "El Paso streetcar project on schedule, on budget". KTSM. October 6, 2016. Retrieved December 14, 2016.
  3. ^ "El Paso Development News: Council Chooses Streetcar Route". Elpasodevnews.com. June 6, 2012. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  4. ^ Ramirez, Cindy (July 22, 2014). "City Council moves forward on El Paso Streetcar Project". El Paso Times. Archived from the original on January 26, 2015. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  5. ^ Perez, Elida S. (2 November 2016). "City, streetcar project scammed for $3.2 million". El Paso Times. Retrieved 22 November 2016.
  6. ^ Flores, Aileen B. "El Paso City Council seeks to refurbish old trolleys for project". El Paso Times. Archived from the original on August 22, 2013. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  7. ^ Torres, Ceasar (2015-11-18). "Blast from the Past: Streetcars Returning to Downtown El Paso". El Paso 411. Retrieved 2017-01-13.
  8. ^ a b Worrell, Carolina (October 27, 2015). "Brookville to restore, modernize El Paso PCC streetcars". Railway Age. Retrieved December 15, 2016.

External links[edit]