El Periódico de Catalunya

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
El Periódico de Catalunya
Type Daily newspaper
Format Berliner
Owner(s) Grupo Zeta
Founder(s) Antonio Asensio Pizarro
Editor Enric Hernàndez
Founded 26 October 1978; 36 years ago (1978-10-26)
Political alignment Centre-left, Social liberalism, Progressivism
Language Spanish and Catalan
Headquarters Consell de Cent, 425-427
08009 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
Circulation 119,374 (2011)
Website Spanish elperiodico.com
Catalan, elperiodico.cat

El Periódico de Catalunya (Catalan: [əɫ pəɾiˈɔðiku ðə kətəˈɫuɲə], Spanish: [el peˈɾjoðiko ðe kataˈluɲa]) is a morning daily newspaper based in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

The paper publishes separate daily editions in Spanish and in Catalan.[1] The two editions combined sell more than 125,000 copies per day, making El Periódico the second highest-circulated newspaper in Spain's Catalan-speaking regions, behind La Vanguardia which also publishes in both languages. Nationally, El Periódico was Spain's fifth-highest circulation general-interest daily in 2011.[2]

History and profile[edit]

El Periódico de Catalunya was first published on 26 October 1978[3][4] by Antonio Asensio Pizarro,[5] to offer a progressive Catalan paper connected to Catalan socialism. The paper has also center-left stance.[6] The paper is owned by Grupo Zeta.[7][8]

One of the most recent directors, Rafael Nadal, is the brother of the Catalan socialist leader Joaquim Nadal. Originally El Periódico printed only in Spanish; it began a Catalan-language edition on 27 October 1997.[9] Today the separate editions are distinguished by the red front-page nameplate on the Spanish version of El Periódico and the blue nameplate on the Catalan edition.

It is regarded as an easy read[citation needed] as compared to its competitors, and its quite popular among working-class people.[citation needed] Following the example of USA Today, El Periódico later began to emphasize graphics and the use of color.[citation needed] Today, it prints every page in color and makes liberal use of charts and photos.

Its current editor is Enric Hernàndez, previously chief of El País bureau in Catalonia.

Circulation[edit]

The circulation of El Periódico de Catalunya was 185,517 copies in 1993[10] and 193,576 copies in 1994.[11][12] Its circulation was 218,000 copies in 2000.[13] The paper had a circulation of 167,000 copies in 2003.[14][15] The 2008 circulation of the paper was 152,025 copies.[16] The paper had a circulation of 133,265 copies in 2009 and 133,035 copies in 2010.[16] It was 119,374 copies in 2011.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Seth Lewis (15 March 2006). "Delivering the News in Two Languages". Nieman Reports. Retrieved 7 June 2015. 
  2. ^ Figures covering July 2010 to June 2011 in Spain, Oficina de Justificación de la Difusión. Retrieved 28 January 2012.
  3. ^ Rosario de Mateo (1989). "The evaolution of the newspaper industry in Spain, 1939-87" (PDF). European Journal of Communication 4. Retrieved 17 April 2015. 
  4. ^ "Media Markets and Newspapers" (PDF). SFN Flash 7 (1). 7 January 2004. Retrieved 17 February 2015. 
  5. ^ "Grupo Zeta. Historia". Periodismo del Siglo XXI (in Spanish). 9 September 2014. Retrieved 13 April 2015. 
  6. ^ Katrin Voltmer (2006). Mass Media and Political Communication in New Democracies. Psychology Press. p. 19. ISBN 978-0-415-33779-3. Retrieved 28 November 2014. 
  7. ^ Frank R. Baumgartner; Laura Chaqués Bonafont (2014). "All News is Bad News: Newspaper Coverage of Political Parties in Spain" (PDF). Political Communication. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  8. ^ "Country Profile: Spain". Institute of Media and Communications Study. Retrieved 21 February 2015. 
  9. ^ El Periódico celebra l'èxit de l'edició en català (in Catalan), 30 April 2011 
  10. ^ Edward F. Stanton (1999). Handbook of Spanish Popular Culture. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. 199. Retrieved 22 February 2015.  – via Questia (subscription required)
  11. ^ "The Daily Press". Contenidos. Retrieved 19 February 2015. 
  12. ^ "Facts of Spain". Florida International University. Retrieved 23 February 2015. 
  13. ^ "Top 100 dailies 2000". campaign. 16 November 2001. Retrieved 2 March 2015. 
  14. ^ Roland Schroeder (2004). "Interactive Info Graphics in Europe-- added value to online mass media: a preliminary survey". Journalism Studies 5 (4). doi:10.1080/14616700412331296473. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  15. ^ "World Press Trends" (PDF). World Association of Newspapers. Paris. 2004. Retrieved 15 February 2015. 
  16. ^ a b c "National Newspapers". International Federation of Audit Bureaux of Circulations. Retrieved 6 March 2015. 

External links[edit]