Taurotragus

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Eland
Taurotragus oryx (captive).jpg
Taurotragus oryx
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Subfamily: Bovinae
Genus: Taurotragus
Wagner, 1855
Species

Taurotragus oryx
Taurotragus derbianus

Taurotragus is a genus of antelopes of the African savanna, commonly known as elands. It contains two species: the common eland T. oryx and the giant eland T. derbianus.

Taxonomy[edit]









Giant eland



Common eland





Greater kudu




Mountain nyala






Bongo



Sitatunga




Kéwel











Nyala




Lesser kudu



Phylogenetic relationships of the mountain nyala from combined analysis of all molecular data (Willows-Munro et.al. 2005)

Taurotragus is a genus of large African antelopes, placed under the subfamily Bovinae and family Bovidae. It was first described by German zoologist Johann Andreas Wagner in 1855.[1] The name is composed of two Greek words: Taurus or Tauros, meaning a bull or bullock;[2][3] and Tragos, meaning a male goat, in reference to the tuft of hair that grows in the eland's ear which resembles a goat's beard.[4]

The genus consists of two species:[5]

  • Giant eland (Taurotragus derbianus)(Gray, 1847) : The largest antelope in the world. It has two subspecies:[6]
  • T. d. derbianus J. E. Gray, 1847 – western giant eland, found in western Africa, particularly Senegal to Mali
  • T. d. gigas Heuglin, 1863 – eastern giant eland, found in central to eastern Africa, particularly Cameroon to South Sudan
  • Common eland (Taurotragus oryx) (Pallas, 1766) : Three subspecies of common eland are recognized, though their validity has been in dispute.[7][8]
  • T. o. livingstonii (Sclater, 1864) (Livingstone's eland): It is found in the Central Zambezian Miombo woodlands. Livingstone's eland has a brown pelt with up to twelve stripes.
  • T. o. oryx (Pallas, 1766) (Cape eland): It is found in south and southwest Africa. The fur is tawny, and adults lose their stripes.
  • T. o. pattersonianus (Lydekker, 1906) (East African eland or Patterson's eland): It is found in east Africa, hence its common name. Its coat can have up to 12 stripes.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. (2005). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 696. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  2. ^ "Taurus". Encyclopaedia Britannica. Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 29 July 2012. 
  3. ^ Harper, Douglas. "Taurus". Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 29 July 2012. 
  4. ^ "Tragos". Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 29 July 2012. 
  5. ^ Taurotragus, Mammal Species of the World
  6. ^ Hildyard, A (2001). "Eland". In Anne Hildyard. Endangered wildlife and plants of the world. Marshall Cavendish. pp. 501–503. ISBN 0-7614-7198-7. 
  7. ^ Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 696–7. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  8. ^ Skinner, JD; Chimimba, CT (2005). "Ruminantia". The Mammals of the Southern African Subregion (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 637–9. ISBN 0-521-84418-5.