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Elda Emma Anderson

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Elda Emma Anderson
Elda Anderson.jpg
Elda Emma Anderson, physicist and health researcher
Born (1899-10-05)October 5, 1899
Green Lake, Wisconsin
Died April 17, 1961(1961-04-17) (aged 61)
Washington, DC
Nationality American
Fields Physicist
Institutions Estherville Junior College
Milwaukee-Downer College
Los Alamos Laboratory
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Alma mater Ripon College
University of Wisconsin
Thesis Low energy levels in the atomic spectra Co VII and Ni VIII (1941)

Elda Emma Anderson (October 5, 1899 – April 17, 1961) was an American physicist and health researcher. During World War II, she worked on the Manhattan Project at Princeton University and the Los Alamos Laboratory, where she prepared the first sample of pure uranium-235 at the laboratory. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin, she became professor of physics at Milwaukee-Downer College in 1929. After the war, she became interested in health physics. She worked in the Health Physics Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and established the professional certification agency known as the American Board of Health Physics.

Early life[edit]

Elda Emma Anderson was born in Green Lake, Wisconsin, on October 5, 1899, to Edwin A. Anderson (born in Wisconsin) and his wife, Lena (née Heller) (born in Germany). Elda was one of three siblings. She had an interest in mathematics from a young age and decided to become a scientist. Anderson earned a Bachelor of Arts (AB) degree from Ripon College in 1922, then a master of arts (AM) in physics from the University of Wisconsin in 1924.[1] From 1924 to 1927, she taught at Estherville Junior College in Iowa, where she was the dean of physics, chemistry and mathematics.[2] In 1929, she became professor of physics at Milwaukee-Downer College, then head of the physics department in 1934.[3]

Career[edit]

In 1941 Anderson completed her PhD at the University of Wisconsin, writing her thesis on "Low energy levels in the atomic spectra Co VII and Ni VIII".[4] Later that year she joined the Office of Scientific Research and Development at Princeton University, where she was involved with the Manhattan Project.[1] In 1943, she joined the Los Alamos Laboratory, where she made measurements of subatomic particles produced by cyclotrons, sometimes working for up to sixteen hours a day.[3] Anderson prepared the first sample of pure uranium-235 at the laboratory.[5] She lived in a dormitory. Being older than most of the other women in the dormitory, she was put in charge. She often worked at night, wearing jeans and a plaid shirt – not the usual attire for a woman at the time.[5]

Following the war, in 1947, Anderson left Los Alamos and returned to teaching at Milwaukee-Downer College, but her involvement in atomic physics led to an interest in the health effects of radiation. In 1949, she left teaching to begin a career in health physics. At the Health Physics Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, which was only five years old when she joined, she became the first chief of education and training. She spent her career helping to establish the new training program in health physics, teaching and advising graduate fellows in health physics from 1949.[1][6]

Anderson organized the first international course in her field in Stockholm in 1955; she organized similar courses in Belgium in 1957 and Mumbai in 1958.[7][8] She supported the establishment of the Health Physics Society in 1955, serving as secretary pro tem and then charter secretary, and eventually as president of the Society from 1959 to 1960. In 1960, she established the professional certification agency known as the American Board of Health Physics.[9] She was its chair until her death.[1]

Atomic Energy Commission[edit]

In 1949, Anderson moved to Oak Ridge, Tennessee to become the first chief of education and training in the Health Physics Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Karl Z. Morgan led the team responsible for training, that was headed by Anderson and assisted by Myron Fair and Mary Jane Cook Hilyer with administrative support from Frances Neal. Anderson also worked with faculty members at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, to create a master's degree program in health physics at that institution.

Death and legacy[edit]

In 1956, Anderson, who never married and had no children, developed leukemia. She died nearly five years later in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, of breast cancer and leukemia, possibly as the result of her work with radioactive materials, on 17 April 1961.[3][10] Anderson was buried at Green Lake Cemetery in Green Lake, Wisconsin. She was survived by her sister, Mrs. Lucille McConnell and niece, Natalie Tarr Millemann. Dr. Anderson's obituary was well covered in the press and scientific journals.[2][11][12][13] Tributes were written by colleagues and former students.[14][15][16] Anderson is honored each year at the annual meeting of the Health Physics Society when the Elda E. Anderson Award is presented to a young member of the Society.

Publications[edit]

  • Ph.D. Dissertation: Anderson, Elda E. (1941). Low Energy Levels in the Atomic Spectra of Cobalt VII and Nickel VIII. University of Wisconsin--Madison.
  • Mack, J. E., & Anderson, E. E. (1944). A 21‐Foot Multiple Range Grazing Incidence Spectrograph. Review of Scientific Instruments. 15(2): 28-36.
  • Anderson, E. E., Lavatelli, L. S., McDaniel, B. D., & Sutton, R. B. (1944). Boron cross sections for neutrons from 0.01 to 1000 eV. Atomic Energy Commission.
  • Anderson, E. E., Lavatelli, L. S., McDaniel, B. D., & Sutton, R. B. (1944). MEASUREMENTS ON THE CROSS-SECTION OF 94 Pu-239 AS A FUNCTION OF NEUTRON ENERGY IN THE RANGE FROM 0.01 eV TO 3.0 eV (No. LA-91). Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. New Mexico.
  • Anderson, E. E., McDaniel, B. D., Sutton, R. B., & Lavatelli, L. S. (1945). ABSORPTION AND FISSION CROSS SECTIONS OF 94 Pu-239 IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE 0.01 eV TO 100 eV (No. LA-266). Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. New Mexico.
  • Sutton, R. B., McDaniel, B. D., Anderson, E. E., & Lavatelli, L. S. (1947). The Capture Cross Section of Boron for Neutrons of Energies from 0.01 eV to 1000 eV. Physical Review. 71(4): 272.
  • McDaniel, B. D., Sutton, R. B., Lavatelli, L. S., & Anderson, E. E. (1947). The Absorption Cross Section of Gold for Neutrons of Energies from 0.01 to 0.3 eV. Physical Review. 72(8): 729.
  • Sutton, R. B., T. Hall, E. E. Anderson, H. S. Bridge, J. W. DeWire, L. S. Lavatelli, E. A. Long, T. Snyder, and R. W. Williams. (1947). Scattering of Slow Neutrons by Ortho- and Parahydrogen. Physical Review. 72(12): 1147.
  • Sutton, R. B., T. Hall, E. E. Anderson, H. S. Bridge, J. W. DeWire, L. S. Lavatelli, E. A. Long, T. Snyder, and R. W. Williams. (1947). Neutron diffraction studies of NaH and NaD. Physical Review. 72: 1147-56.
  • Anderson, Elda E. (1950). Manual on Radiological Protection for Civilian Defense (No. M-4514). Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
  • Anderson, E. E. (1952). Units of radiation and radioactivity. Public Health Reports. 67(3): 293.
  • Anderson, E. E. (1954). Education and Training of Health Physicists. Radiology. 62(1): 83-87.
  • Lukens Jr, H. R., Anderson, E. E., & Beaufait Jr, L. J. (1954). Punched Card System for Radioisotopes. Analytical Chemistry. 26(4): 651-652.
  • Kohl, J., Newacheck, R. L., & Anderson, E. E. (1955). Gaseous and Liquid Tracers for Underground Studies. In Proceedings. University of California.
  • Kohl, J., Newacheck, R. L., & Anderson, E. E. (1955). Locating Casing Shoe Leaks with Radioactive Argon. Transactions of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. 204(12): 213-216.
  • Newacheck, R. L., Beaufait, L. J., & Anderson, E. E. (1957). Isotope Milker Supplies 137Ba from Parent 137Cs. Nucleonics. 15(5): 122.
  • Beaufait Jr, L. J., Anderson, E. E., & Peterson, J. P. (1958). Development and Preparation of Set of Gamma Spectrometer Standards. Analytical Chemistry. 30(11): 1762-1764.
  • Anderson, Elda E. (1959). Assignment report on training course for health physicists. Bombay, India. November-December 1958.
  • Zumwalt, L. R., & Anderson, Elda E. (1960). Xe-133 Release Data Obtained to Date on Various Sample Fuel Bodies (No. GA-P-32-257). General Atomic Division. General Dynamics Corp. San Diego, CA.
  • Anderson, E. E., Gethard, P. E., & Zumwalt, L. R. (October 1961). Use of the King Furnace in Fission-Product Retention Studies of Graphite Reactor Fuels. In Proceedings of the Second Conference on Nuclear Reactor Chemistry. Gatlinburg, Tennessee (pp. 171-192).
  • Anderson, E. E., Gethard, P. E., & Zumwalt, L. R. (1962). Steady-State Release Fraction of Krypton and Xenon Fission Products at High Temperatures from (U, Th) C2-Graphite Fuel Matrix in Out-Of-Pile Experiments (No. GA-3211). General Atomic Div. General Dynamics Corp. San Diego, CA.
  • Zumwalt, L. R., Anderson, E. E., & Gethard, P. E. (1962). Fission Product Retention Characteristics of Certain (Th, U) C2-Graphite Fuels. Proceedings. ANS Topical Meeting on Materials and Fuels for High-Temperature Nuclear Energy Applications. 11-13.
  • Anderson, E. E., Wessman, G. L., & Zumwalt, L. R. (1962). Fission Product Trapping—Sorption of Cesium by Activated Charcoal. Nuclear Science and Engineering. 12(1): 106-110.
  • Zumwalt, L. R., Gethard, P. E., & Anderson, E. E. (1963). Fission-Product Release from 'Single-Crystal' UC2 Particles. Transactions of the American Nuclear Society. 6(1): 132.
  • Anderson, E. E., Gardner, J. O., Gethard, P. E., Goeddel, W. V., Hooker, J. R., Lonsdale, H. K., ... & Zumwalt, L. R. (1963). Advanced, Graphite-Matrix, Dispersion-Type Fuel Systems. Annual Report. April 1, 1962-March 31, 1963 (No. GA-4022;(Pt. 1)). General Atomic Division. General Dynamics Corp. San Diego, CA.
  • Anderson, Elda E., & Zumwalt, L. R. (1964). The Diffusion of Barium in Simulated High-Temperature Graphite Fuel Elements. Transactions of the American Nuclear Society. (US). 7.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Sicherman, Barbara, and Carol Hurd Green (1980). Notable American Women: The Modern Period. Harvard University Press. p. 20. ISBN 9780674627338. 
  2. ^ a b Editor. (19 April 1961). Atom Bomb worker Dies, Dr. Elda Anderson. The Milwaukee Journal. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. p. 16.
  3. ^ a b c Yount, Lisa (2008). A to Z of Women in Science and Math. Facts on File library of world history (2nd ed.). Infobase. p. 7. ISBN 0-8160-6695-7. Retrieved April 29, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Low energy levels in the atomic spectra Co VII and Ni VIII". University of Wisconsin-Madison. Retrieved March 19, 2015. 
  5. ^ a b Howes, Ruth H.; Herzenberg, Caroline L. (1999). Their Day in the Sun: Women of the Manhattan Project. Temple University. p. 35. ISBN 978-0-585-38881-6. OCLC 49569088. 
  6. ^ Morgan, K. Z. (1965). Graduate Programs for the Health Physicist in the United States. Health Physics. 11(9): 895-915.
  7. ^ Anderson, Elda E. (1959). Assignment report on training course for health physicists. Bombay, India. November-December 1958.
  8. ^ Anderson, Elda E. (18 June 1960). Meetings of the World Health Organization. Technical Program, 1959-1960, p.17. American Society for Metals. Oak Ridge Chapter Yearbook. C'est Bon Restaurant. Knoxville, TN.
  9. ^ Moeller, D. W. (1972). History of the American Board of Health Physics. American Journal of Public Health. 62(2): 247-251.
  10. ^ a b Ogilvie, Marilyn Bailey (2000). Joy Dorothy Harvey, eds. The biographical dictionary of women in science: pioneering lives from ancient times to the mid-20th century 1. Taylor & Francis US. pp. 33–34. ISBN 0-415-92038-8. 
  11. ^ Oak Ridger. (18 April 1961). Elda Anderson, Obituary. Oak Ridge, TN.
  12. ^ Health Physics. (May 1961). Obituary. Elda Anderson, Pioneer of Health Physics in the Atomic Energy Program, dies at 61. Health Physics. 5(2): 244.
  13. ^ Physics Today. (July 1961). Elda Anderson, Obituary. Physics Today. 14(7): 68.
  14. ^ Sanders Jr, S. M. (1968). Elda Emma Anderson. Health Physics. 15(3): 217-218.
  15. ^ Mills, W. A. (1969). Elda Emma Anderson. Health Physics. 17(3): 403-404.
  16. ^ Kathren, Ronald L. and Tarr, Natalie E. (November 1974). The Origins of the Health Physics Society. Health Physics. 27(5): 419-428.

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