Eleanor Davis

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Eleanor Davis
Born
Eleanor Davis

January 16, 1983
NationalityAmerican
Known forcartoonist
AwardsPrint Magazine New Visual Artist (2009)
ALA Geisel Honor Award (2009)

Eleanor McCutcheon Davis (born January 16, 1983) is an American cartoonist and illustrator who creates comic works and other art for both adolescent and adult audiences.

Early life[edit]

Eleanor Davis was raised in Tucson, Arizona[1] by comic enthusiast parents who exposed her to stories and styles such as Little Lulu, Krazy Kat, Little Nemo and the Kinder Kids. She attended Kino School, an alternative school in Tucson, from elementary school until she graduated from high school. It wasn't until high school, when she was introduced to the zine/minicomics world of alternative comics by classmates, that she started to draw comics seriously. In high school she began to self-publish her own comic and soon after decided to attend the Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia to study sequential art.[2] Davis's work began to get noticed for her original handmade die-cuts and coloring but was further helped by her diligent production of minicomics, attending comic conventions, and online presence.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

Davis has self-published many comics, including The Beast Mother.

Davis's work has also been included in five issues of Fantagraphics' anthology MOME as well as Houghton Mifflin's Best American Comics in 2008.[3]

Her easy-reader book, Stinky, was published in 2008 by Françoise Mouly's Toon Books. The book won her an ALA Geisel Honor Award in 2009. The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook, published by Bloomsbury Children's in 2009, was a collaborative book created with husband Drew Weing, who did the inking to Eleanor's illustrations for the book. In 2009, she won the Eisner's Russ Manning Most Promising Newcomer Award and was named one of Print magazine's New Visual Artists.[4] In 2013, her short story In Our Eden received a gold medal from the Society of Illustrators.[5]

In August 2014, Fantagraphics published Davis' first collection of stories How to Be Happy. Slate described the collection as "a mix of evocative, geometric watercolors and fluid pen-and-ink cartoons, How to Be Happy tells stories of sad people, lonely people, strong people, confident people, all trying to find a tiny bit of happiness in life."[6] Upon the publication of How to Be Happy, comics critic Richard Bruton described Davis as "without question, a major young creator."[7] Her 2017 graphic novel You & a Bike & a Road, published by Koyama Press, won the Ignatz Award for Outstanding Anthology or Collection.[8]

Her latest book, Why Art?, was published by Fantagraphics in 2018.[9] Davis teaches comic book storytelling classes at the University of Georgia.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Davis currently lives and works in Athens, Georgia, with fellow cartoonist and husband, Drew Weing.[10]

Selected works[edit]

  • Stinky. Toon Books. (2008) ISBN 0979923840
  • The Secret Science Alliance and the Copycat Crook. (2009) Bloomsbury. ISBN 1599903962.
  • How to Be Happy. Fantagraphics. (2014) ISBN 1606997408.
  • You & a Bike & a Road. Koyama Press. (2017) ISBN 9781927668405.
  • Why Art? Fantagraphics. (2018) ISBN 9781683960829.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Comic Book Camp A: Beginning & Intermediate". University of Georgia. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  2. ^ Kartalopoulos, Bill "Eleanor Davis." Print. 2009
  3. ^ Fantagraphics author page
  4. ^ "Upcoming: Eleanor Davis' How to Be Happy. Forbidden Planet. April 19, 2014.
  5. ^ "Society of Illustrators award announcement". January 2013.
  6. ^ Kois, Dan. "How to Be Happy." Slate. July 2014.
  7. ^ Bruton, Richard (April 19, 2014). "Upcoming: Eleanor Davis' How to Be Happy". Forbidden Planet International.
  8. ^ Koyama Press. Koyama Press >> You & a Bike & a Road Koyama Press. May 2017.
  9. ^ Fantagraphics . Artists :: Eleanor Davis :: Why Art? Fantagraphics . 2018.
  10. ^ Vigneault, François (2014). "Scout Books Artist Profile: Eleanor Davis". 2014.

External links[edit]