Eleanor Humes Haney

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Eleanor "Elly" Humes Haney (December 30, 1931 – July 10, 1999) was an American feminist theologian and community activist.[1]

Personal[edit]

Haney was born in Milford, Delaware, on December 30, 1931. She died on July 10, 1999, in Phippsburg, Maine.

Education[edit]

Haney attended The College of William & Mary, where she received a B.A. in English. She attended Wellesley College, where she received an M.A. in English. She obtained a master's degree in Religious Education (MRE) from the Presbyterian School of Christian Education. She then went to Yale University where she obtained a Ph.D. in Christian Ethics.

Career[edit]

Haney held a number of teaching positions at different schools in the New England area: Virginia Union, Concordia College, the University of New England, Westbrook College, MECA, Bangor Theological Seminary and the University of Southern Maine.

Publications[edit]

She wrote six books on feminist theology, ecological ethics, economic justice, anti-racism and alliance-building, the most important being A Feminist Legacy: The Ethics of Wilma Scott Heide and Company (1985). Heide was the third national President of the National Organization for Women (NOW).

Haney also wrote The Great Commandment: A Theology of Resistance and Transformation (Pilgrim Press, 1998).

Awards and recognition[edit]

Haney was a member of Phi Beta Kappa Society.

She received the Hartman Award from the University of Maine in 1998.[2]

The Bangor Daily News described her as a "theology pioneer" and said she had "a major impact on Maine."[3]

Legacy[edit]

The Eleanor Humes Haney Fund (or foundation) is a charitable foundation funded by a grant from Haney. The aims of the fund are to give grants to charitable organisations in the New England Area that strive to:

  • Improve collaboration across a range of groups and constituencies to address major oppressions such as racism, sexism, classism and/or anthropocentrism
  • Build alliances to challenge more effectively the status quo at any or all levels: local, state, national, and/or international
  • Create effective ways to achieve social and economic justice
  • Involve ethical principles that can be transferred to other contexts

The fund has supported initiatives like :

  • Add Verb Productions (a nonprofit organization headquartered in Portland, Maine that provides health and wellness education through provocative theatre performances)[4]
  • Organizations focussing on LGBT issues like: Charlie Howard Remembered[5]
  • Organizations encouraging civic activism and sponsoring documentaries like "There ought to be a Law"[6]

References[edit]

External links[edit]