Electoral district of Alexandria

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Alexandria
New South WalesLegislative Assembly
State New South Wales
Dates current 1904–1920, 1927–1930
Namesake Alexandria

Alexandria was an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales, created in 1904, partly replacing Waterloo, and named after and including the Sydney suburb of Alexandria. With the introduction of proportional representation, it was absorbed into the multi-member electorate of Botany. It was recreated in 1927, but was abolished in 1930.[1]

Members for Alexandria[edit]

John Dacey, the sitting Labor MP for Botany since 1895, was defeated for Labor pre-selection in that seat. However he agreed to stand in the newly formed seat of Alexandria. His main opponent was George Anderson, the Liberal Reform MP who had held the seat of Waterloo since its creation in 1894. In one of the closest results of the 1904 election, Dacey defeated Anderson by a mere 117 votes. At the 1907 election, Dacey defeated sitting MP for Surry Hills Albert Bruntnell. Dacey increased his majority at the 1910 election and served until his death on 11 April 1912. The resulting by-election in May saw Dacey's son-in-law Simon Hickey easily account for the Liberal Reform's William John Ferguson who was the Member for Sturt from 1894 to 1904. Hickey increased his majority at the 1913 election and defeated high profile former state and federal MP Sydney Smith in 1917. Hickey went to serve as one of the members for Botany from 1920. When the seat was recreated in 1927, former MP for Botany Bill Ratcliffe served one term before the seat was abolished for good.

First incarnation (1904–1920)
Member Party Term
  John Dacey Labour 1904–1912
  Simon Hickey Labor 1912–1920
Second incarnation (1927–1930)
  Bill Ratcliffe Labor 1927–1930

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New South Wales Parliamentary Record 1824 – 2007" (PDF). Parliament of New South Wales. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 December 2013. Retrieved 9 December 2013.