Electoral history of Joe Biden

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Biden at his presidential kickoff rally in Philadelphia, May 2019

This is the electoral history of Joe Biden, the 46th and current President of the United States.[1] Biden served as the 47th Vice President of the United States (2009–2017) and as a United States Senator from Delaware (1973–2009). Biden is the oldest elected president, the first from Delaware, and the second Catholic.

A member of the Democratic Party, Biden was elected to the New Castle County Council in 1970 and became the sixth-youngest senator in American history when he was elected to the U.S. Senate from Delaware in 1972, at the age of 29. He was re-elected to the Senate six times, and was the fourth-most senior senator. He ran unsuccessfully for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1988 and again in 2008.

In January 2009, Biden resigned from the Senate to serve as Barack Obama's vice president after they won the 2008 presidential election and were re-elected to a second term in 2012. As vice president, Biden oversaw infrastructure spending in 2009 to counteract the Great Recession.[2] His negotiations with congressional Republicans helped pass legislation including the 2010 Tax Relief Act, which resolved a taxation deadlock;[3] the Budget Control Act of 2011, which resolved a debt ceiling crisis;[4] and the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which addressed the impending "fiscal cliff".[5]

Biden announced his candidacy in the 2020 presidential election on April 25, 2019.[6] A total of 29 major candidates declared their candidacies for the primaries, the largest field of presidential candidates for any American political party since 1972;[7] but over time the field narrowed down to Biden and Senator Bernie Sanders from Vermont.[8] Eventually, Sanders withdrew from the race and Biden became the presumptive Democratic nominee in April 2020;[9] and reached the delegate threshold needed to secure the nomination in June 2020.[10] He defeated incumbent president Donald Trump in the general election, with 306 electoral votes to Trump's 232. Biden received more than 81 million votes, the most votes ever cast for a candidate in a U.S. presidential election.[11]

County council elections[edit]

1970[edit]

1970 New Castle County, Delaware Councilman for the 4th District[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph R. Biden, Jr. 10,573 55.4
Republican Lawrence T. Messick 8,192 42.9
American Kenneth A. Horner 317 1.7
Total votes 19,082 100.0

Senatorial elections[edit]

1972[edit]

1972 United States Senate election in Delaware[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden 116,006 50.5%
Republican J. Caleb Boggs (incumbent) 112,844 49.1%
American Henry Majka 803 0.4%
Prohibition Herbert B. Wood 175 0.1%

1978[edit]

1978 United States Senate election in Delaware[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden (incumbent) 93,930 58.0%
Republican James H. Baxter, Jr. 66,479 41.0%
American Donald G. Gies 1,663 1.0%

1984[edit]

1984 United States Senate election in Delaware[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden (incumbent) 147,831 60.1%
Republican John M. Burris 98,101 39.9%

1990[edit]

1990 United States Senate election in Delaware[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden (incumbent) 112,918 62.7%
Republican M. Jane Brady 64,554 35.8%
Libertarian Lee Rosenbaum 2,680 1.5%
None Others 5 0.0%

1996[edit]

1996 United States Senate election in Delaware[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden (incumbent) 165,465 60%
Republican Ray Clatworthy 105,088 38%
Libertarian Lee Rosenbaum 3,340 1.2%
Natural Law Jacqueline Kossoff 1,698 0.6%

2002[edit]

2002 United States Senate election in Delaware[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden (incumbent) 135,253 58.2%
Republican Ray Clatworthy 94,793 40.8%
Delaware Independent Bud Barros 996 0.4%
Libertarian Raymond Buranello 922 0.4%
Natural Law Robert E. Mattson 350 0.2%

2008[edit]

2008 United States Senate election in Delaware[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden (incumbent) 257,484 64.7%
Republican Christine O'Donnell 140,584 35.3%

Presidential primaries[edit]

1984[edit]

1984 Democratic National Convention, Presidential tally[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Walter Mondale 2,191 56.41%
Democratic Gary Hart 1,201 30.92%
Democratic Jesse Jackson 466 12.00%
Democratic Thomas Eagleton 18 0.46%
Democratic George McGovern 4 0.10%
Democratic John Glenn 2 0.05%
Democratic Joe Biden 1 0.03%
Democratic Martha Kirkland 1 0.03%
Total votes 3,884 100.00%

1988[edit]

1988 Democratic National Convention, Presidential tally[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Michael Dukakis 2,877 70.09%
Democratic Jesse Jackson 1,219 29.70%
Democratic Richard Stallings 3 0.07%
Democratic Joe Biden 2 0.05%
Democratic Dick Gephardt 2 0.05%
Democratic Lloyd Bentsen 1 0.02%
Democratic Gary Hart 1 0.02%
Total votes 4,162 100.00%

Presidential elections[edit]

2008[edit]

2008 New Hampshire Democratic Party vice presidential primaries[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raymond Stebbins 50,485 46.93%
Democratic William Bryk 22,965 21.35%
Democratic John Edwards 10,553 9.81%
Democratic Barack Obama 6,402 5.95%
Democratic Bill Richardson 5,525 5.14%
Democratic Hillary Clinton 3,419 3.18%
Democratic Joe Biden 1,512 1.41%
Democratic Al Gore 966 0.90%
Democratic Dennis Kucinich 762 0.71%
Democratic Bill Clinton 388 0.36%
Republican John McCain 293 0.27%
Democratic Christopher Dodd 224 0.21%
Republican Ron Paul 176 0.16%
Republican Jack Barnes, Jr. 95 0.09%
Democratic Mike Gravel 91 0.09%
Democratic Joe Lieberman 67 0.06%
Republican Mitt Romney 66 0.06%
Republican Mike Huckabee 63 0.06%
Republican Rudy Giuliani 46 0.04%
Democratic Darrel Hunter 20 0.02%
Total votes 104,118 100.00%

Excluding penalized contests,[23] only primary and caucuses votes:

2008 Democratic Party presidential primaries[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barack Obama 16,706,853 49.04%
Democratic Hillary Clinton 16,239,821 47.67%
Democratic John Edwards 742,010 2.18%
Democratic Bill Richardson 89,054 0.26%
Democratic Uncommitted 82,660 0.24%
Democratic Dennis Kucinich 68,482 0.20%
Democratic Joe Biden 64,041 0.19%
Democratic Mike Gravel 27,662 0.08%
Democratic Christopher Dodd 25,300 0.07%
Democratic Others 22,556 0.07%
Total votes 34,068,439 100.00%

Including penalized contests:

2008 Democratic Party presidential primaries[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hillary Clinton 18,225,175 48.03%
Democratic Barack Obama 17,988,182 47.41%
Democratic John Edwards 1,006,275 2.65%
Democratic Uncommitted 299,610 2.79%
Democratic Bill Richardson 106,073 0.28%
Democratic Dennis Kucinich 103,994 0.27%
Democratic Joe Biden 81,641 0.22%
Democratic Scattering 44,348 0.12%
Democratic Mike Gravel 40,251 0.11%
Democratic Christopher Dodd 35,281 0.09%
Total votes 37,980,830 100.00%
2008 Democratic National Convention, Vice Presidential tally[25]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden _[26] 100.00%
Total votes 100.00%
Electoral college map of the 2008 election
Obama: 365 votes (28 states + DC + NE-02)
McCain: 173 votes (22 states)
2008 United States presidential election[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barack Obama / Joe Biden 69,498,516 52.93%
Republican John McCain / Sarah Palin 59,948,323 45.65%
Independent Ralph Nader / Matt Gonzalez 739,034 0.56%
Libertarian Bob Barr / Wayne Allyn Root 523,715 0.40%
Constitution Chuck Baldwin / Darrell Castle 199,750 0.15%
Green Cynthia McKinney / Rosa Clemente 161,797 0.12%
American Independent Alan Keyes / Wiley Drake 47,941 0.04%
N/A Other 242,685 0.18%
Total votes 131,313,820 100.00%
Democratic gain from Republican

2012[edit]

2012 Democratic National Convention, Vice Presidential tally[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden _[29] 100.00%
Total votes 100.00%
Electoral college map of the 2012 election
Obama/Biden: 332 votes (26 states + DC)
Romney/Ryan: 206 votes (24 states)
2012 United States presidential election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barack Obama / Joe Biden (inc.) 65,915,795 51.06%
Republican Mitt Romney / Paul Ryan 60,933,504 47.20%
Libertarian Gary Johnson / Jim Gray 1,275,971 0.99%
Green Jill Stein / Cheri Honkala 469,627 0.36%
Constitution Virgil Goode / James Clymer 122,389 0.09%
Peace and Freedom Roseanne Barr / Cindy Sheehan 67,326 0.05%
Justice Rocky Anderson / Luis J. Rodriguez 43,018 0.03%
American Independent Tom Hoefling / J.D. Ellis 40,628 0.03%
Reform Andre Barnett / Kenneth Cross 956 0.00%
N/A Other 216,196 0.19%
Total votes 129,085,410 100.00%
Democratic hold

2020[edit]

First-instance vote by state and territory
2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries[30]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden 19,058,036 51.9%
Democratic Bernie Sanders 9,674,912 26.3%
Democratic Elizabeth Warren 2,830,184 7.7%
Democratic Michael Bloomberg 2,493,382 6.8%
Democratic Pete Buttigieg 923,867 2.5%
Democratic Amy Klobuchar 529,566 1.4%
Democratic Tulsi Gabbard 273,840 0.8%
Democratic Other 963,356 2.6%
Total votes 36,747,143 100.00%
2020 Democratic National Convention, Presidential tally[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden 2,716 68.25%
Democratic Bernie Sanders 1,112 27.95%
Democratic Elizabeth Warren 67 1.68%
Democratic Michael Bloomberg 49 1.23%
Democratic Pete Buttigieg 24 0.6%
Democratic Amy Klobuchar 7 0.18%
Democratic Others 2 0.05%
Total votes 3,979 100.00%
Electoral college map of the 2020 election
Biden/Harris: 306 votes (25 states + DC + NE-02)
Trump/Pence: 232 votes (25 states + ME-02)
2020 United States presidential election[32]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Biden / Kamala Harris 81,268,924 51.31%
Republican Donald Trump / Mike Pence (incumbents) 74,216,154 46.86%
Libertarian Jo Jorgensen / Spike Cohen 1,865,724 1.18%
Green Howie Hawkins / Angela Walker 405,035 0.26%
N/A Other 628,584 0.40%
Total votes 158,383,403 100.00%
Democratic gain from Republican

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Biden and Harris inauguration live: Joe Biden becomes the 46th US president". BBC News. Retrieved 2021-01-20.
  2. ^ Biden, Joe (February 5, 2017). "Assessing the Recovery Act: 'The best is yet to come'". The White House. Archived from the original on January 24, 2017. Retrieved April 5, 2013.
  3. ^ Hulse, Carl; Calmes, Jackie (December 7, 2010). "Biden and G.O.P. Leader Helped Hammer Out Bipartisan Tax Accord". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 8, 2010. Retrieved December 8, 2010.
  4. ^ Scherer, Michael (July 1, 2009). "What Happened to the Stimulus?". Time. Archived from the original on January 9, 2014. Retrieved July 8, 2009.
  5. ^ Demirjian, Karoun (January 1, 2013). "It's over: House passes 'fiscal cliff' deal". Las Vegas Sun. Archived from the original on January 15, 2021. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  6. ^ Saenz, Arlette (April 25, 2019). "Joe Biden announces he is running for president in 2020". CNN. Archived from the original on April 25, 2019. Retrieved April 25, 2019.
  7. ^ Burns, Alexander; Flegenheimer, Matt; Lee, Jasmine C.; Lerer, Lisa; Martin, Jonathan (January 10, 2020). "Who's Running for President in 2020?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 22, 2020.
  8. ^ Korecki, Natasha (March 2, 2020). "How Biden engineered his astonishing comeback". Politico. Retrieved October 22, 2020.
  9. ^ Ember, Sydney (April 8, 2020). "Bernie Sanders Is Dropping Out of 2020 Democratic Race for President". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  10. ^ Detrow, Scott (June 5, 2020). "Biden Formally Clinches Democratic Nomination, While Gaining Steam Against Trump". NPR. Retrieved June 5, 2020. The AP delegate estimate reached the magic number of 1,991 delegates for Biden as seven states and the District of Columbia continue counting votes from Tuesday's primaries
  11. ^ Lewis, Sophie (November 7, 2020). "Joe Biden breaks Obama's record for most votes ever cast for a U.S presidential candidate". CBS.
  12. ^ "State of Delaware Official Results of General Election (Excluding Write-in Votes) 1970" (PDF). Office of the Delaware State Election Commissioner. Retrieved 2020-04-28.
  13. ^ Clerk of the United States House of Representatives (1973). "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 7, 1972" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office.
  14. ^ Clerk of the United States House of Representatives (1979). "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 7, 1978" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office.
  15. ^ Clerk of the United States House of Representatives (1985). "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 6, 1984" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office.
  16. ^ Clerk of the United States House of Representatives (1991). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office.
  17. ^ Clerk of the United States House of Representatives (1997). "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 5, 1996" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office.
  18. ^ Clerk of the United States House of Representatives (2003). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office.
  19. ^ Clerk of the United States House of Representatives (2009). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008" (PDF). U.S. Government Printing Office.
  20. ^ Our Campaigns - US President - D Convention Race - Jul 16, 1984
  21. ^ http://partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/880621convention-dem-ra.html Accessed: April 4, 2013
  22. ^ "Presidential Primary Election January 8". Sos.nh.gov. 2008-01-08. Archived from the original on 2011-09-27. Retrieved 2012-01-04.
  23. ^ Florida and Michigan violated Democratic National Committee rules by moving their primaries before February 5, 2008, resulting in a nullification of their primaries, until the DNC Rules and Bylaws Committee voted to restore half their delegates.
  24. ^ a b "2008 Democratic Popular Vote". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved February 15, 2020.
  25. ^ "CNN.com Video". CNN. Retrieved May 1, 2010.
  26. ^ chosen by acclamation.
  27. ^ "Federal Elections 2012" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Washington, D.C.: Federal Election Commission. 2013. Retrieved January 20, 2021.
  28. ^ "Beau Biden Speech Kicks Of Motion To Nominate Father Joe Biden For Vice President". The Huffington Post. September 6, 2012.
  29. ^ chosen by acclamation.
  30. ^ "Democratic Convention - Nationwide Popular Vote". The Green Papers. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  31. ^ "The Math Behind the Democratic Delegate Allocation - 2020". The Green Papers. Retrieved January 4, 2020.
  32. ^ "Official 2020 presidential general election results" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. 1 February 2021. Retrieved 6 February 2021.