Electoral history of Lyndon B. Johnson

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President Lyndon B. Johnson, 1969

Electoral history of Lyndon B. Johnson, the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969), 37th Vice President of the United States (1961–1963); United States Senator (1949–1961) and United States Representative (1937–1949) from Texas.

Texas's 10th congressional district special election, 1937

  • Lyndon B. Johnson (D) - 8,280 (27.65%)
  • Morton Harris (D) - 5,111 (17.07%)
  • Polk Shelton (D) - 4,420 (14.76%)
  • Sam V. Stone (D) - 4,048 (13.52%)
  • C. N. Avery (D) - 3,951 (13.19%)
  • Houghton Brownell (D) - 3,019 (10.08%)
  • Ayers Ross (D) - 1,088 (3.63%)

Texas's 10th congressional district election, 1938

unopposed

Texas's 10th congressional district election, 1940

unopposed

Texas United States Senate special election, 1941:[1]

Texas's 10th congressional district election, 1942

unopposed

Texas's 10th congressional district election, 1944

unopposed

Texas's 10th congressional district election, 1946

unopposed

Texas United States Senate election, 1948 (Democratic primary runoff):[2]

  • Lyndon B. Johnson - 494,191 (50.00%)
  • Coke Stevenson - 494,104 (50.00%)

Texas United States Senate election, 1948:[3]

Texas United States Senate election, 1954:[4]

1956 Democratic National Convention (Presidential tally):[5]

1956 Democratic National Convention (Vice Presidential tally):[6]

First ballot:

1960 Democratic National Convention (Presidential tally):[7]

1960 Democratic National Convention (Vice Presidential tally):[8]

  • Lyndon B. Johnson - 1,521 (100.00%)

United States presidential election, 1960:

Texas United States Senate election, 1960:[9]

  • Lyndon B. Johnson (D) (inc.) - 1,306,625 (57.98%)
  • John Tower (R) - 926,653 (41.12%)
  • Bard A. Logan (Constitution) - 20,506 (0.91%)

1964 Democratic presidential primaries:[10]

1964 Democratic National Convention (Presidential tally):[11]

  • Lyndon B. Johnson (inc.) - 2,316 (100.00%)

United States presidential election, 1964:

1968 Democratic presidential primaries:[12]

References[edit]