Elicitation technique

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An elicitation technique is any of a number of data collection techniques used in anthropology, cognitive science, counseling, education, knowledge engineering, linguistics, management, philosophy, psychology, or other fields to gather knowledge or information from people. Elicitation, in which knowledge is sought directly from human beings, is usually distinguished from indirect methods such as gathering information from written sources.[1]

A person who interacts with human subjects in order to elicit information from them may be called an elicitor, an analyst, experimenter, or knowledge engineer, depending on the field of study.[1]

Elicitation techniques include interviews, observation of either naturally occurring behavior (including as part of participant observation) or behavior in a laboratory setting, or the analysis of assigned tasks.[1]

List of elicitation techniques[edit]

  • Interviews
  • Brain Storming
  • Focus Groups
  • Exploratory Prototypes
  • User Task Analysis
  • Observation
  • Surveys
  • Questionnaire

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Cooke, Nancy J. (1994). "Varieties of knowledge elicitation techniques". International Journal of Human-Computer Studies. 41: 801–849.