Elisabethenkirche, Basel

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Elisabethenkirche and centre square.
Stone pulpit, with a carved wood canopy.
Church lock, marked with the year 1863.

The Elisabethenkirche, or Offene Kirche Elisabethen, is a 19th-century church building in the centre of Basel, next to the Theater Basel, in Switzerland.

It is a well detailed example of Swiss Gothic Revival style churches. It has a 72 metres (236 ft) tall bell tower and spire. The tower has internal stairs.

History[edit]

The church was begun in 1857 and completed in 1864. The construction was sponsored by the wealthy Basel businessman Christoph Merian and his wife Margarethe Burckhardt-Merian. [1] They were both laid to rest in black marble sarcophagi in the crypt below the church's main floor.

The Merians also founded the Christoph-Merian-Stiftung.

Today's congregation forms part of the Evangelical-Reformed Church of the Canton Basel-Stadt.

Present day[edit]

Today the church is home of the first Swiss "OpenChurch" or Offene Kirche Elisabethen]. [2] The Offene Kirche Elisabethen caters to the spiritual, cultural and social needs of urban people of all backgrounds: Businesspeople, shoppers, tourists, asylum seekers, working poor, minorities, homeless etc.

The Offene Kirche Elisabethen is well known throughout the region and county for the Fasnachtsgottesdienst, [3] a service in honor of the Carnival of Basel.

Schöpfungsfeier (service with blessing of the human-animal relation), Heilungsfeiern (weekly and trimesterly healing-/blessing services for people in need and sorrow) and their gender aware spiritual practice ("Women at the altar", "Lesbian-Gay-Biseuexual-Transgender"-Community[permanent dead link]).

Nearly 50'000 people visit the church per year.

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Coordinates: 47°33′10″N 7°35′28″E / 47.55278°N 7.59111°E / 47.55278; 7.59111