Elizabeth Anne Sueltenfuss

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Elizabeth Anne Sueltenfuss

Born(1921-04-14)April 14, 1921
DiedDecember 19, 2009(2009-12-19) (aged 88)
Burial placeProvidence Cemetery
Our Lady of the Lake University
San Antonio, Texas, United States
Alma materOur Lady of the Lake College (BA, 1944, botany and zoology)
University of Notre Dame (PhD, 1963, microbiology)

Sister Elizabeth Anne Sueltenfuss (April 14, 1921 – December 19, 2009)[1] was an American educator and Catholic sister.[2]

Sueltenfuss was born on April 14, 1921 in San Antonio, Texas to Edward L. and Elizabeth Amrein Sueltenfuss.[2] In 1941, she became a Sister of Divine Providence. In the following years she taught at high schools in Louisiana and Oklahoma. She was a faculty advisory member[3] of honor society Sigma Zeta's Sigma chapter at OLLU, serving as national vice-president from 1964 to 1965 and as national president from 1965 to 1966.[4]

She was the first woman and fourth person to serve as president of Our Lady of the Lake University (OLLU) in San Antonio, taking the office in 1978.[5] She oversaw OLLU's introduction of a weekend college program in the late 1970s. Following her resignation in 1997, she held the title of OLLU president emerita. In September 2000, the Sueltenfuss Library at OLLU was dedicated in her honor.[6]

During her career in education, she was treasurer and director of the Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas, as well as director of the Association of Texas Colleges and Universities.[2] Sueltenfuss was inducted into the San Antonio Women's Hall of Fame in 1985, and served as president of the organization from 1993–1995.[7]

She was awarded the Yellow Rose of Texas Education Award by the Constance Allen Guild for Lifetime Learning,[8] and was a member of the San Antonio chapter of Zonta International.[9]

Sueltenfuss was posthumously inducted into the Texas Women's Hall of Fame on January 17, 2019 at a ceremony in Austin.

Further reading[edit]

  • Tracy, Sister Mary Joanna; Sueltenfuss, Sister Elizabeth Anne (June 1, 1956). "Partition chromatography: A demonstration". Journal of Chemical Education. 33 (6): 281. doi:10.1021/ed033p281.
  • First European Trip, 1963
  • Morkovsky, Mary Christine (2009). Living in God's Providence: History of the Congregation of Divine Providence of San Antonio, Texas, 1943-2000. XLibris. ISBN 9781436386128. OCLC 489739685.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sister Elizabeth Anne Sueltenfuss". Texas Women's University. October 26, 2018. Retrieved 21 July 2019.
  2. ^ a b c "Sister Elizabeth Anne Sueltenfuss". Wilson County News. December 23, 2009. Retrieved 21 July 2019.
  3. ^ "The Sigma Zetan" (PDF). Sigma Zeta. Retrieved 21 July 2019.
  4. ^ "National Officers History". Sigma Zeta. Retrieved 21 July 2019.
  5. ^ "Sister Elizabeth Anne Sueltenfuss, CDP, inducted into the Texas Women's Hall of Fame". Congregation of Divine Providence. Sisters of Divine Providence. January 25, 2019. Retrieved 21 July 2019.
  6. ^ "Library Mission & History". Our Lady of the Lake University. Retrieved 21 July 2019.
  7. ^ "26th Anniversary Gala Celebration, Brunch, and 2010 Induction Ceremony" (PDF). San Antonio Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved 21 July 2019.
  8. ^ Morkovsky, Mary Christine (2009). Living in God's Providence: History of the Congregation of Divine Providence of San Antonio, Texas, 1943-2000. XLibris. ISBN 9781436386128. OCLC 489739685.
  9. ^ "A Guide to the Zonta Club of San Antonio Records, 1958-2008". University of Texas at San Antonio. Retrieved 21 July 2019. Locally prominent members of the Club have included Lila Cockrell, Sister Elizabeth Anne Sueltenfuss, Florence K. Rosengren, Alicia Carpenter, and "Heloise" Ponce Evans.