Elizabeth Raum

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Elizabeth Raum (born 13 January 1945) is a Canadian oboist and composer.

Biography[edit]

Elizabeth Raum was born in Berlin, New Hampshire in 1945, but became a Canadian citizen in 1985. She studied oboe performance with Robert Sprenkle at the Eastman School of Music, graduating in 1966.[1] In 1985, received a master's degree in composition from the University of Regina after studies with Thomas Schudel.[2] She played principal oboe for the Atlantic Symphony Orchestra in Halifax, Nova Scotia, for seven years, and later for the Regina Symphony Orchestra in Regina, Saskatchewan. In 2004, she received an honorary doctorate from Mount St. Vincent University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. [3] In November 2010, she received the Saskatchewan Order of Merit for her work as a musician and composer.[4]

Works[edit]

Elizabeth Raum's works have been performed internationally and broadcast on national media. She is a prolific composer and has produced opera, chamber pieces, choral works, vocal works and ballets. She has also written extensively for film and video. Works for selected films include:

  • Saskatchewan River
  • Like Mother, Like Daughter
  • Sparkle
  • Evolution: A Theme with Variations
  • Prelude to Parting
  • The Green Man Ballet
  • Symphony of Youth

Selected recordings include:

  • Prairie Alphabet Musical Parade
  • A Prairie Alphabet
  • The Legend of Heimdall
  • Renovated Rhymes
  • Incantations and Rhymes
  • Sonata for Piano Four Hands
  • Requiem for Wounded Knee
  • Pantheon for violin, horn, and piano
  • how bodies leave ecstatic marks

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Elizabeth Raum". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Historica Canada. Retrieved 21 February 2017. 
  2. ^ Bone, Lloyd E.; Paull, Eric; Morris, R. Winston (2007). Guide to the Euphonium Repertoire: The Euphonium Source Book. Indiana University Press. 
  3. ^ Sadie, Julie Anne; Samuel, Rhian (1994). The Norton/Grove dictionary of women composers. 
  4. ^ "Elizabeth Raum". Archived from the original on 5 November 2012. Retrieved 11 January 2013. 

External links[edit]