Elizaveta Tuktamysheva

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Elizaveta Tuktamysheva
Elizaveta Tuktamysheva (winner 2015 European Championships).jpg
Tuktamysheva at the 2015 Europeans
Personal information
Native nameЕлизавета Серге́евна Туктамышева (Russian)
Full nameElizaveta Sergeyevna Tuktamysheva
Alternative namesTuktamisheva
Country representedRussia Russia
Born (1996-12-17) 17 December 1996 (age 22)
Glazov, Udmurtia, Russia
ResidenceSaint Petersburg, Russia
Height1.57 m (5 ft 2 in)
CoachAlexei Mishin, Tatiana Prokofieva
Former coachSvetlana Veretennikova
ChoreographerTatiana Prokofieva, Emanuel Sandhu
Former choreographerStéphane Lambiel, Benoît Richaud, Jeffrey Buttle, Anton Pimenov, David Wilson, Georgi Kovtun,[1] Tatiana Rodionova, Edvald Smirnov[1]
Skating clubYubileyny
Training locationsSaint Petersburg
Former training locationsGlazov
World standing13 (2018–19)
24 (2017–18)
5 (2016–17)
2 (2015–16)
1 (2014–15)
14 (2013–14)
10 (2012–13)
22 (2011–12)
44 (2010–11)
Season's bests2 (2018-19)[2]
21 (2017-18)[3]
20 (2016-17)[4]
8 (2015–16)[5]
1 (2014–15)[6]
20 (2013–14)[7]
8 (2012–13)[8]
7 (2011–12)[9]
12 (2010–11)[10]
ISU personal best scores
Combined total234.43
2019 World Team Trophy
Short program80.54
2019 World Team Trophy
Free skate153.89
2019 World Team Trophy

Elizaveta Sergeyevna "Liza" Tuktamysheva (pronounced Took-tah-MISH-eh-va, even though in the past she insisted on pronouncing it Took-TAH-mish-eh-va;[11] Russian: Елизавета Серге́евна Туктамышева; born 17 December 1996) is a Russian figure skater. She is the 2015 World champion, the 2015 European champion, the 2014–15 Grand Prix Final champion and the 2013 Russian national champion. On the junior level, she is the 2012 Youth Olympic champion, 2011 World Junior silver medalist, and 2010–11 JGP Final silver medalist.

At the 2015 World Championships, she became the first female skater to land four triple jumps in a short program (triple Axel, triple lutz, and a triple toe-triple toe combination).[12] At the 2018–19 Grand Prix Final, she became the first woman to land twelve triple jumps in one international competition, the maximum allowed after the establishment of the Zayak rule.[13] However, the triple Axel in the short program was judged to be under-rotated. She succeeded in landing all twelve cleanly at the 2019 World Team Trophy competition, becoming the first and so far only woman to accomplish the feat in senior international ISU competition.[14]

Personal life[edit]

Elizaveta Sergeyevna Tuktamysheva (occasionally romanized Tuktamisheva)[15] was born 17 December 1996 in Glazov, Udmurtia, Russia.[16] Her mother teaches algebra and geometry and was her daughter's class teacher from the 5th to 9th grade.[1][17] Her father, a former skier who later coached soccer,[1] died in April 2011.[18] Her sister, Evgenia, is seven years younger and has also taken up skating.[1] The family moved from Glazov to Saint Petersburg in August 2011.[19][20]

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Tuktamysheva with her coaches, Svetlana Veretennikova and Alexei Mishin

Tuktamysheva started skating at the age of four, after meeting girls interested in the sport at a summer camp.[1][21] Her first coach was Svetlana Veretennikova in Glazov. Alexei Mishin observed Tuktamysheva at a competition in Belgorod but did not invite her into his group, considering her technique too incomplete.[1][22] A year later he saw her again and changed his mind due to her ability to jump high,[1] but she had to rework the technique on all of her jumps.[17] Since her family could not afford to move to a big city, she remained in Glazov, continuing to train under Veretennikova, but regularly visited Mishin in Saint Petersburg, where she lived in a dormitory.[23][24] The train journey from Glazov to Saint Petersburg took 27 hours.[1] Until the summer of 2011, she would spend an average of one to two weeks in Saint Petersburg and the rest of the month in Glazov.[1][20][25]

Tuktamysheva was called a figure skating prodigy by the Russian media, because at the age of 12 she performed difficult jumps, such as the triple axel in practice,[26] but she did not attempt the triple axel in competition until 2015. In 2008, she placed tenth at the Russian Championships.[27] Mishin was criticized for allowing Tuktamysheva to participate in the senior Russian Championships (2008) at only 11 years old.[28]

In 2009, Tuktamysheva won the silver medal at the Russian Championships, after placing fourth in the short program and first in the free skating.[29] She placed second with a margin of 0.67 points behind champion Adelina Sotnikova, who is half a year older than Tuktamysheva.[30][31] Mishin said his student was Russia's "main hope for the gold medal at the Sochi Olympics".[23] Despite her medal, she was not sent to any ISU Championships, including Junior Worlds, because she was not old enough according to ISU rules.

At the 2010 Russian Championships, Tuktamysheva was tenth after the short program but earned 124.57 points in the free skate and was able to win a bronze medal.[32] Her technical marks were higher than even those of male competitors. In March, she skated in the Kings on Ice ice show.[33] During the summer, she took part in training camps in Estonia, Italy and Germany in preparation for the new season.[1]

2010–2011 season: Junior World silver[edit]

In the 2010–11 season, Tuktamysheva was old enough to compete in ISU Junior competitions. She won her Junior Grand Prix events in Germany and Romania and qualified for the Junior Grand Prix Final.[34] At the Final, she placed second in both programs to win silver behind Adelina Sotnikova.[35] At the 2011 Russian Championships, she placed seventh in the short program and 3rd in the long, to win the bronze medal.[36] She won the Russian Junior Championships by placing first in both programs. At the 2011 World Junior Championships, she won the silver medal behind teammate Adelina Sotnikova.[37][38]

Tuktamysheva settled with her family in Saint Petersburg in the summer of 2011. In preparation for the new season, she took part in Mishin's training camps in Jaca (Spain), Tartu (Estonia), and Pinzolo (Italy).[19][39]

2011–2012 season: Grand Prix debut and Youth Olympics[edit]

According to ISU age rules, Tuktamysheva was eligible for the senior Grand Prix circuit during the 2011–12 season, although not for senior ISU Championships. She was assigned to two Grand Prix events, the 2011 Skate Canada and 2011 Trophée Éric Bompard. Tuktamysheva replaced the injured Sarah Meier at the Japan Open in October and won the event.[40][41] Tuktamysheva debuted on the senior Grand Prix circuit at Skate Canada,[42] where she won the gold medal with a combined personal best score of 177.38 points, becoming the youngest champion in the event since Tracey Wainman in 1981.[43] She dedicated the win to her late father.[18] Tuktamysheva then won gold at 2011 Trophée Éric Bompard to qualify for her first senior Grand Prix Final. She is the first ladies' skater to win her senior debut event and to win both events in her senior Grand Prix debut.[44] At the Grand Prix Final, she finished fourth with a combined total of 174.51 points.

At the 2012 Russian Championships, Tuktamysheva was seventh in the short program and fourth in the free skate and finished sixth overall. She then competed at the 2012 Winter Youth Olympics and won the gold medal. Tuktamysheva withdrew from the 2012 World Junior Championships in order to prepare for the following season, including working on the triple axel.[45]

2012–2013 season: National title and European bronze[edit]

In the summer before the 2012–13 season, Tuktamysheva sustained a knee injury.[46] She was assigned to 2012 Skate Canada and the 2012 Trophée Éric Bompard,[47] entering both events as the defending champion. In October, Mishin said that her participation at Skate Canada was uncertain due to injury and growth issues.[48] Tuktamysheva did compete in Skate Canada, placing sixth in the short program and third in the free skate. She finished fourth overall with a total score of 168.00, just 0.04 less than bronze medalist Kanako Murakami. At the 2012 Trophée Éric Bompard, Tuktamysheva was third in the short program and second in the free skate. She obtained a personal best free skating score, 121.36 points, and won the silver medal ahead of teammate Yulia Lipnitskaya.[46] Tuktamysheva qualified for the Grand Prix Final in Sochi, Russia, where she was fifth in the short program and second in the long, finishing fifth overall.[49] At the 2013 Russian Championships, also held in Sochi, she placed first in the short program[50] but fell ill with a cold before the free skate. Mishin initially indicated that she would withdraw but later she and her team decided she would compete. Tuktamysheva said, "I might find myself in an even worse situation in the future. I have to know how to handle it, so we decided to skate."[51] She finished first in the free skate and won her first senior national title.[51]

At the 2013 European Championships, Tuktamysheva placed fourth in the short program, first in the long program, and won the bronze medal overall. She and silver medalist Adelina Sotnikova were Russia's first medalists in the Europeans ladies' event since Irina Slutskaya won the title in 2006. At the 2013 World Championships, Tuktamysheva was fourteenth in the short program after falling from a sit spin and singling her double Axel. She placed eighth in the long program and finished tenth overall in her Worlds debut. At the 2013 World Team Trophy in Tokyo, she finished tenth individually while Team Russia was fourth overall.

2013–2014 season[edit]

Tuktamysheva started her season at the 2013 Finlandia Trophy. Placing sixth in the short and second in the free, she won the bronze medal behind Akiko Suzuki and Yulia Lipnitskaya. At the 2013 Skate America, she placed ninth in the short and third in the free, finishing fourth overall with 176.75 points. Despite a back injury, she competed at her next event, the 2013 Rostelecom Cup, and finished fourth behind Mirai Nagasu. After taking the bronze medal at the 2013 Golden Spin of Zagreb behind Miki Ando, Tuktamysheva competed as the defending champion at the 2014 Russian Championships. She came in tenth after placing ninth in both segments. On 2 March 2014, she sustained an ankle injury at the Russian Cup Final — the preliminary diagnosis suggested a torn ankle ligament.[52] Although she hoped to resume training at the end of March,[53] her injury took longer to heal and she returned to the ice in mid-June.[54]

2014–2015 season: World Champion[edit]

Tuktamysheva at the 2015 World Championships

Tuktamysheva began her season by winning her first ISU Challenger Series (CS) event, the 2014 Nebelhorn Trophy, where she outscored teammate Alena Leonova by almost six points and American Gracie Gold by over ten points. She then won another CS title at the 2014 Finlandia Trophy, defeating American Samantha Cesario by more than 30 points. She also won CS title at the 2014 Warsaw Cup and with these results she later became the winner of the 2014–15 ISU Challenger Series.

Tuktamysheva started her Grand Prix season at the 2014 Skate America; she placed first in the short and second in the free skate, taking the silver medal behind Elena Radionova.[55] At her next event, the 2014 Cup of China, she won the gold medal, beating teammate Yulia Lipnitskaya.[56][57] The results qualified her to the Grand Prix Final, which she won with a new personal best combined total of 203.58, ahead of Radionova and American Ashley Wagner.[58] At the 2015 Russian Championships, Tuktamysheva placed second in both programs, finishing with the silver behind Radionova. She subsequently won the 2015 European Championship by a slim margin of 0.86, finishing second in the short program and first in the free skate, posting personal bests in both segments.[59]

At the 2015 World Figure Skating Championships, Tuktamysheva won the short program with a new personal best of 77.62, the third highest short program score under the ISU Judging System.[60] She performed the triple axel for the first time in major competition, becoming the sixth woman to complete the jump and the fourth to do so at the World Championships. She also completed a triple toe-triple toe combination and a triple Lutz,[61] making her the first woman to land four triples in the short program. Tuktamysheva went on to win the free skate with a score of 132.74,[62] for a total of 210.36.[63] She decisively won the event, earning 16.76 points over silver medalist Satoko Miyahara, becoming the third Russian woman to win the World Championships (after Maria Butyrskaya in 1999 and Irina Slutskaya in 2002 and 2005).

After her victory, Tuktamysheva ended her season skating for team Russia at the 2015 World Team Trophy. She placed second in the short program, 0.33 points behind Gracie Gold, earning 11 points. She then won the free program with a score of 134.21 (including a triple Axel), winning 12 points, which greatly aided Team Russia in winning the silver medal.[64][65]

2015–2016 season[edit]

In the spring of 2015, Tuktamysheva went to Switzerland to work with Stéphane Lambiel on new programs and spent time training with Carolina Kostner while she was there.[66] Lambiel choreographed Peer Gynt, her free program, and I Put a Spell on You, intended as her short program but which she decided to use as her exhibition.[67] Benoît Richaud created her new short program, Carmina Burana.

Tuktamysheva began her season by placing third in the individual competition of the Japan Open before winning the gold medal at the 2015 International Cup of Nice. Turning to the Grand Prix series, she won silver at Skate Canada behind Ashley Wagner after placing seventh in the short program but winning the free skate.[68] At the Trophée Éric Bompard in Bordeaux, France, she placed fifth in the short program after falling on a triple Axel. Due to the cancellation of the free skate following the November 2015 Paris attacks, the short program standings were accepted as final. As a result, she finished as the second alternate for the 2015–16 Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final and was unable to defend her title. Tuktamysheva finished first in the 2015–16 ISU Challenger Series standings after winning gold medals at the 2015 Warsaw Cup and at the 2015 Golden Spin of Zagreb with a season's best score of 201.33 points. After the Warsaw Cup, Tuktamysheva decided to switch back to her Boléro short program from the previous season. At the 2016 Russian Championships, she finished eighth after placing ninth in the short and sixth in the free skate. She was named as an alternate for the 2016 European Championships.

Tuktamysheva was invited to the 2016 Team Challenge Cup but withdrew due to an ankle injury.[69]

2016–2017 season[edit]

Tuktamysheva began her season competing at the 2016 CS Nebelhorn Trophy where she won the silver medal, after placing first in the short and second in the free skate. She then competed at the 2016 CS Finlandia Trophy where she placed fourth. In her Grand Prix events, she placed third at 2016 Cup of China and fourth at 2016 Skate Canada. After her Grand Prix events she competed at one more Challenger event, 2016 CS Golden Spin of Zagreb, whre she won the silver medal.

At the 2017 Russian Championships Tuktamysheva finished 8th. In February 2017 she competed at the 2017 Winter Universiade where she placed fourth.

2017–2018 season[edit]

Tuktamysheva started her season by competing in two Challenger events. First she competed at the 2017 CS Lombardia Trophy where she placed sixth and then she skated at the 2017 CS Finlandia Trophy where she won the bronze medal. In her Grand Prix events, she placed 7th at the 2017 Cup of China and ninth at the 2017 Internationaux de France. After the Grand Prix events she skated her third Challenger event of the season, at the 2017 CS Golden Spin of Zagreb where she won the bronze medal.

At the 2018 Russian Championships Tuktamysheva finished seventh.

2018–2019 season: Comeback[edit]

In the summer before the start of the 2018-19 season, Tuktamysheva began training both the triple Axel and the triple Lutz-triple toe loop combination again with the intention of adding both components back into her programs in competition. [70] She started her season in September at the 2018 Lombardia Trophy where she won the gold medal by a margin of over 21 points over the silver medalist, her training mate Sofia Samodurova, after placing first in both the short program and the free skate. During her free skate, she landed a fully rotated triple axel but stepped out of the landing and received negative GOE for the jump. Nevertheless, Tuktamysheva's final score of 206.07 was her best result since the 2014-2015 season.

At the 2018 Finlandia Trophy, Tuktamysheva again won gold after placing first in both segments. She attempted the triple axel in her free skate, as well as in her short program for the first time in competition. Both attempts were ratified as fully rotated, but received negative grades of execution (GOE) due to three-turns out of the landings of both jumps.

Tuktamysheva competed at her first Grand Prix assignment, 2018 Skate Canada at the end of October. She won the competition by a narrow margin of just 0.26 points over silver medalist Mako Yamashita after a costly fall on her triple axel in the free skate opened the door for the rest of field. She placed first in the short program with a new season's best of 74.22, landing her triple axel cleanly for the first time this season, and third in free skate behind Yamashita and Russian teammate Evgenia Medvedeva. During the gala exhibition portion of the competition, Tuktamysheva performed a controversial program to Toxic by Britney Spears, where she stripped down to her bra partway through the performance. The program was received with a combination of shock and fanfare.[71]

In early November, Tuktamysheva competed at her second Grand Prix assignment, 2018 NHK Trophy, where she won the bronze medal behind Japanese skaters Rika Kihira and Satoko Miyahara. She scored personal bests in both the free skate (142.85) and overall, with a score of 219.02 points. She ranked first the in short program, but dropped to third in the free skate. Though she landed fully rotated triple Axels in both programs, she had to do a three-turn out of her landing in the free skate and received negative GOE for the jump. With her gold and bronze Grand Prix medals, and a total of 26 qualification points, she qualified to the 2018–19 Grand Prix Final. At the Final, Tuktamysheva returned to the podium with a bronze medal, landing all of her elements cleanly except for the triple Axel in her short program which was judged underrotated[72]. She expressed satisfaction with having successfully increased her program difficulty in press conferences at the event.[73]

On 12 December 2018, in the week before the 2019 Russian Figure Skating Championships, Tuktamysheva was forced to withdraw from the competition after being hospitalized with pneumonia.[74] Russian media outlet TASS reported that her recovery would take two weeks. After Russian Nationals, she was named to the 2019 Winter Universiade team and as first alternate to the 2019 European Figure Skating Championships team.

In February of 2019, Tuktamysheva competed at the Russian Cup Final, going to head to head with countrywomen Evgenia Medvedeva and Stanislava Konstantinova to earn a spot on the Russian 2019 World Figure Skating Championships team. Though she won the free skate, Tuktamysheva placed second overall behind Medvedeva. After several days of deliberation, the Russian Figure Skating Federation's board of coaches named Medvedeva to the team along with Alina Zagitova and Tuktamysheva's training mate Sofia Samodurova. Tuktamysheva was named first alternate. This decision was controversial, with some feeling that Tuktamysheva should have been selected based on the strong season she had had.[75] The skater herself posted on Twitter afterward: "Inside myself still was a little girl who naively believed. You’ve killed her. But I’m a fighter and will return."[76]

On March 26, 2019, Tuktamysheva was named to the Russian team for the 2019 World Team Trophy alongside training mate Sofia Samodurova. [77] At the competition, she set new personal best scores in both programs as well as overall after skating both of her programs cleanly for the first time all season. With both programs cleanly performed, she became the first and only woman to land twelve clean triple jumps in one international competition.[14] Tuktamysheva finished first overall in the ladies event and earned a bronze medal for Team Russia's collective efforts.

Programs[edit]

Tuktamysheva at the 2015 European Championships podium
Tuktamysheva at the 2014 Skate America podium
Tuktamysheva at the 2012 Trophée Éric Bompard podium
Tuktamysheva with her fellow medalists at the 2011 Skate Canada
Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2019–2020 [78]
2018–2019
[70]
  • Assassin's Tango
    by John Powell
    choreo. by Tatiana Prokofieva, P. Mitriashina
2017–2018
[79]
  • Erinnerung
    performed by Efim Jourist Quartett
2016–2017
[80][81]


2015–2016
[16][82][83][84]

2014–2015
[56][85]
  • Boléro
    by Maurice Ravel
    choreo. by Tatiana Prokofieva
  • Batwannis Beek
    by The REG Project
  • Sandstorm
    by La Bionda
    choreo. by Tatiana Prokofieva

  • Koop Island Blues
    by Koop

2013–2014
[86]

  • Gopher Mambo
    by Yma Sumac
    choreo. by Tatiana Prokofieva, Anton Pimenov
  • Adiós Nonino
    by Astor Piazzolla
    choreo. by Stéphane Lambiel
2012–2013[87][88]
  • Adiós Nonino
    by Astor Piazzolla
    choreo. by Stéphane Lambiel


  • Adiós Nonino
    by Astor Piazzolla
    choreo. by Stéphane Lambiel
2011–2012[19]
  • Bésame Mucho
    (piano and violin version)
  • Caravan
    ("Mr. Bongo" 1998 album)
    by Jack Costanzo
  • Bésame Mucho
    ("Marvellous" 1994 album)
    by Michel Petrucciani
    choreo. by Georgi Kovtun
  • Harem
    by R.E.G. Project
    choreo. by Georgi Kovtun
2010–2011[15]
  • Harem
    (from The Casbah)
    by R.E.G. Project
    choreo. by Georgi Kovtun

  • Harem
    by R.E.G. Project
    choreo. by Georgi Kovtun
2009–2010
  • Asturias
    by Isaac Albéniz
    choreo. by Georgi Kovtun
  • Solveig's Song
    (from Peer Gynt)
    by Edvard Grieg
2008–2009
  • Gypsy Dance
    (from Don Quixote)
    by Ludwig Minkus

2007–2008

Competitive highlights[edit]

2010–11 to present[edit]

GP: Grand Prix; CS: Challenger Series; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

International[89]
Event 10–11 11–12 12–13 13–14 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18–19 19–20
Worlds 10th 1st
Europeans 3rd 1st
GP Final 4th 5th 1st 3rd
GP Cup of China 1st 3rd 7th TBD
GP France 1st 2nd 5th 9th
GP NHK Trophy 3rd
GP Rostelecom Cup 4th
GP Skate America 4th 2nd TBD
GP Skate Canada 1st 4th 2nd 4th 1st
CS Finlandia 1st 4th 3rd 1st
CS Golden Spin 1st 2nd 3rd
CS Lombardia 6th 1st
CS Nebelhorn 1st 2nd
CS Warsaw Cup 1st 1st
Bavarian Open WD
Cup of Nice 1st 1st
Dragon Trophy 1st
Finlandia Trophy 3rd
Golden Spin 3rd
Nordics 2nd
Sarajevo Open 1st
Winter Universiade 4th WD
International: Junior[89]
Junior Worlds 2nd WD
Youth Olympics 1st
JGP Final 2nd
JGP Germany 1st
JGP Romania 1st
Cup of Nice 1st
National[90]
Russian Champ. 3rd 6th 1st 10th 2nd 8th 8th 7th WD
Russian Jr. Champ. 1st
Russian Cup Final WD 2nd 2nd
Team events
World Team Trophy 4th T
10th P
2nd T
1st P
3rd T
1st P
Japan Open 2nd T
1st P
3rd T
3rd P
TBD = Assigned; WD = Withdrew
Levels: J = Junior
T = Team result; P = Personal result. Medals awarded for team result only.

2006–07 to 2009–10 : Pre-junior debut[edit]

International: Novice[89]
Event 06–07 07–08 08–09 09–10
Cup of Nice 1st 1st
National[90]
Russian Championships 10th 2nd 3rd
Russian Junior Championships 8th[91] 9th[92] 2nd 4th
Russian Cup Final 4th J 1st
Levels: N = Novice; J = Junior

Detailed results[edit]

Senior level[edit]

Tuktamysheva at the 2014–15 Grand Prix Final
Tuktamysheva performing a Layback spin at the 2012–13 Grand Prix Final
Tuktamysheva at the 2011–12 Grand Prix Final

Small medals for short and free programs awarded only at ISU Championships. At team events, medals awarded for team results only.

2018–19 season
Date Event SP FS Total
11–14 April 2019 2019 World Team Trophy 2
80.54
1
153.89
3T/1P
234.43
18–22 February 2019 2019 Russian Cup Final
domestic competition
4
72.21
1
148.98
2
221.19
7–10 February 2019 2019 Dragon Trophy 1
65.66
1
122.45
1
188.11
6–9 December 2018 2018–19 Grand Prix Final 3
70.65
3
144.67
3
215.32
9–11 November 2018 2018 NHK Trophy 1
76.17
3
142.85
3
219.02
26–28 October 2018 2018 Skate Canada 1
74.22
3
129.10
1
203.32
4–7 October 2018 2018 CS Finlandia Trophy 1
73.83
3
129.02
1
202.85
12–16 September 2018 2018 CS Lombardia Trophy 1
65.69
1
140.38
1
206.07
2017–18 season
Date Event SP FS Total
21–24 December 2017 2018 Russian Championships 6
71.07
8
130.99
7
202.06
6–9 December 2017 2017 CS Golden Spin of Zagreb 1
68.47
5
107.43
3
175.90
17–19 November 2017 2017 Internationaux de France 11
53.03
8
114.62
9
167.65
3–5 November 2017 2017 Cup of China 5
67.10
6
129.58
7
196.68
6–8 October 2017 2017 CS Finlandia Trophy 1
67.82
4
121.31
3
189.13
14–17 September 2017 2017 CS Lombardia Trophy 6
58.91
6
125.84
6
184.75
2016–17 season
Date Event SP FS Total
2–5 March 2017 2017 Nordics Open 2
60.72
2
117.41
2
178.13
1–5 February 2017 2017 Winter Universiade 2
69.01
6
102.67
4
171.68
20–26 December 2016 2017 Russian Championships 6
69.17
10
125.35
8
194.52
7–10 December 2016 2016 CS Golden Spin of Zagreb 5
63.01
1
129.02
2
192.03
18–20 November 2016 2016 Cup of China 4
64.88
2
127.69
3
192.57
28–30 October 2016 2016 Skate Canada International 3
66.79
5
121.20
4
187.99
6–10 October 2016 2016 CS Finlandia Trophy 4
62.99
4
102.60
4
165.59
22–24 September 2016 2016 CS Nebelhorn Trophy 1
65.20
2
120.73
2
185.93
2015–16 season
Date Event SP FS Total
24–27 December 2015 2016 Russian Championships 9
63.68
6
131.06
8
194.74
2–5 December 2015 2015 Golden Spin of Zagreb 1
69.48
1
131.85
1
201.33
26–29 November 2015 2015 Warsaw Cup 1
64.18
1
128.75
1
192.93
13–15 November 2015 2015 Trophée Éric Bompard 5
56.21
Cancelled 5
56.21
30 October–1 November 2015 2015 Skate Canada International 7
55.37
1
133.62
2
188.99
15–18 October 2015 2015 International Cup of Nice 2
59.12
1
120.11
1
179.23
3 October 2015 2015 Japan Open 3
128.34
3T/3P
2014–15 season
Date Event SP FS Total
16–19 April 2015 2015 World Team Trophy 2
70.93
1
134.21
2T/1P
205.14
23–29 March 2015 2015 World Championships 1
77.62
1
132.74
1
210.36
11–15 February 2015 2015 Bavarian Open 1
66.75
WD
28 January – 1 February 2015 2015 European Championships 2
69.02
1
141.38
1
210.40
24–28 December 2014 2015 Russian Championships 2
73.62
2
138.73
2
212.35
11–14 December 2014 2014–15 Grand Prix Final 1
67.52
1
136.06
1
203.58
21–24 November 2014 2014 Warsaw Cup 1
67.83
1
128.83
1
196.66
7–9 November 2014 2014 Cup of China 2
67.99
1
128.61
1
196.60
24–26 October 2014 2014 Skate America 1
67.41
2
122.21
2
189.62
15–19 October 2014 2014 International Cup of Nice 1
65.15
1
121.55
1
186.70
9–12 October 2014 2014 Finlandia Trophy 1
67.05
1
126.26
1
193.31
25–27 September 2014 2014 Nebelhorn Trophy 2
64.94
1
127.71
1
192.65
2013–14 season
Date Event SP FS Total
24–26 December 2013 2014 Russian Championships 9
59.81
9
115.78
10
175.59
5–8 December 2013 2013 Golden Spin of Zagreb 3
58.81
3
110.43
3
169.24
22–24 November 2013 2013 Rostelecom Cup 5
60.16
5
111.71
4
171.87
18–20 October 2013 2013 Skate America 9
53.20
3
123.55
4
176.75
4–6 October 2013 2013 Finlandia Trophy 6
52.13
2
121.32
3
173.45
2012–13 season
Date Event SP FS Total
11–14 April 2013 2013 World Team Trophy 10
49.94
8
102.22
4T/10P
152.16
13–17 March 2013 2013 World Championships 14
54.72
8
119.52
10
174.24
23–27 January 2013 2013 European Championships 4
57.18
1
131.67
3
188.85
25–28 December 2012 2013 Russian Championships 1
69.50
1
127.07
1
196.57
6–9 December 2012 2012–13 Grand Prix Final 5
56.61
2
117.14
5
173.75
16–18 November 2012 2012 Trophée Éric Bompard 3
58.26
2
121.36
2
179.62
26–28 October 2012 2012 Skate Canada International 6
55.10
3
112.90
4
168.00
2011–12 season
Date Event SP FS Total
25–29 December 2011 2012 Russian Championships 7
58.32
4
116.08
6
174.40
8–11 December 2011 2011–12 Grand Prix Final 5
54.99
2
119.52
4
174.51
17–20 November 2011 2011 Trophée Éric Bompard 1
62.04
2
120.85
1
182.89
27–30 October 2011 2011 Skate Canada International 1
59.57
2
117.81
1
177.38
1 October 2011 2011 Japan Open 1
118.59
2T/1P

Junior level[edit]

Tuktamysheva at the 2010–11 JGP Final

Small medals for short and free programs awarded only at ISU Championships.

2011–12 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
13–22 January 2012 2012 Winter Youth Olympics Junior 1
61.83
1
111.27
1
173.10
2010–11 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
28 Feb. – 6 March 2011 2011 World Junior Championships Junior 2
58.60
2
110.51
2
169.11
2–4 February 2011 2011 Russian Junior Championships Junior 1
60.96
1
132.60
1
193.56
26–29 December 2011 2011 Russian Championships Senior 7
56.30
3
124.41
3
180.71
9–12 December 2010 2010 Junior Grand Prix Final Junior 2
53.76
2
107.11
2
160.87
6–10 October 2010 2010 JGP Germany Junior 1
57.35
1
115.43
1
172.78
8–12 September 2010 2010 JGP Romania Junior 4
46.11
1
86.21
1
132.32
13–17 October 2010 2010 Coupe de Nice Junior 1
50.52
1
104.51
1
155.03
2009–10 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
3–6 February 2010 2010 Russian Junior Championships Junior 9
54.12
4
104.89
4
159.01
23–27 December 2009 2010 Russian Championships Senior 10
48.96
1
124.57
3
173.53
2008–09 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
28–31 January 2009 2009 Russian Junior Championships junior 4
2
2
155.14
24–28 December 2008 2009 Russian Championships Senior 5
49.82
1
110.06
2
159.88
15–19 October 2008 2008 Coupe de Nice Novice 1
1
1
127.15
2007–08 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
30 Jan. – 2 Feb. 2008 2008 Russian Junior Championships Junior 15
6
9
118.16
3–7 January 2008 2008 Russian Championships Senior 14
35.28
8
84.37
10
119.65
18–21 October 2007 2007 Coupe de Nice Novice 2
1
1
111.34
  • ISU Personal Bests highlighted in bold.

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

Media related to Elizaveta Tuktamysheva at Wikimedia Commons