Elkhorn, Wisconsin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Elkhorn, Wisconsin
City of Elkhorn
Elkhorn Wisconsin Welcome Sign.jpg
Motto(s): 
“Living in Harmony”[1]
Location of Elkhorn in Walworth County, Wisconsin.
Location of Elkhorn in Walworth County, Wisconsin.
Coordinates: 42°40′22″N 88°32′25″W / 42.67278°N 88.54028°W / 42.67278; -88.54028Coordinates: 42°40′22″N 88°32′25″W / 42.67278°N 88.54028°W / 42.67278; -88.54028
Country United States
State Wisconsin
CountyWalworth
Area
 • Total8.11 sq mi (21.00 km2)
 • Land8.06 sq mi (20.88 km2)
 • Water0.04 sq mi (0.11 km2)
Elevation1,030 ft (314 m)
Population
 • Total10,084
 • Estimate 
(2019)[5]
10,019
 • Density1,242.59/sq mi (479.78/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
Zip Code
53121
Area code(s)262
FIPS code55-23300[6]
GNIS feature ID1564532[3]
Websitewww.cityofelkhorn.org

Elkhorn is a city in Walworth County, Wisconsin, United States. It is located 40 miles (64 km) southwest of Milwaukee. As of 2019, it is home to 10,019 people, down from 10,084 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat.[7]

Geography[edit]

Elkhorn is located at 42°40′22″N 88°32′25″W / 42.67278°N 88.54028°W / 42.67278; -88.54028 (42.672900, -88.540342).[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.81 square miles (20.23 km2), of which 7.76 square miles (20.10 km2) is land and 0.05 square miles (0.13 km2) is water.[9]

History[edit]

In 1836, Colonel Samuel Phoenix spotted a rack of elk antlers in a tree and proclaimed the area as "Elk Horn."[10]

The area's beauty and fertile soil led Daniel Bradley, his son Milo, and LeGrand Rockwell to create a community in the area.[11] Its growth to a population of 539 led to the first town meeting in 1846. Elkhorn was designated county seat that same year because of its location in Walworth County.

In 1851, Elkhorn became the location of the Walworth County Fair, which is now hosted annually at the Walworth County Fairgrounds. The Walworth County Fair is the largest in Wisconsin after the Wisconsin State Fair.[citation needed]

In the 1870s, saline water from springs located in Elkhorn was believed to cure rheumatism.[12]

Because the city places Christmas decorations around its center, Elkhorn has been called the "Christmas Card Town" since before World War II. This tradition is celebrated every year by an annual oil painting by local artist Jan Castle Reed. These watercolor paintings are turned into Christmas cards.[13]

Elkhorn is also known for the folklore of the Beast of Bray Road, a supposed werewolf type creature that has become the focus of books, movies, documentaries and other elements of pop culture.[14]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
185042
18601,0812,473.8%
18701,20511.5%
18801,122−6.9%
18901,44729.0%
19001,73119.6%
19101,707−1.4%
19201,99116.6%
19302,34017.5%
19402,3821.8%
19502,93523.2%
19603,58622.2%
19703,99211.3%
19804,60515.4%
19905,33715.9%
20007,30536.9%
201010,08438.0%
2019 (est.)10,019[5]−0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]
Elkhorn, 11:23:40 PM CDT in 2012 during Expedition 30 at the International Space Station
Elkhorn, 11:23:40 PM CDT in 2012 during Expedition 30 at the International Space Station

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 10,084 people, 3,801 households, and 2,514 families living in the city. The population density was 1,299.5 inhabitants per square mile (501.7/km2). There were 4,043 housing units at an average density of 521.0 per square mile (201.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 91.4% White, 1.2% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 4.8% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.0% of the population.

There were 3,801 households, of which 38.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.7% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.9% were non-families. 27.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.11.

The median age in the city was 34.3 years. 27.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 29.1% were from 25 to 44; 23.3% were from 45 to 64; and 11.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.7% male and 50.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 7,305 people, 2,919 households, and 1,903 families living in the city. The population density was 1,005.2 people per square mile (388.0/km2). There were 3,014 housing units at an average density of 414.7 per square mile (160.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.81% White, 0.47% African American, 0.40% Native American, 0.55% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.83% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.13% of the population.

There were 2,919 households, out of which 37.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.6% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.8% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 28.0% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 32.2% from 25 to 44, 18.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $38,395, and the median income for a family was $47,475. Males had a median income of $34,867 versus $22,253 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,003. About 7.4% of families and 9.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.7% of those under age 18 and 10.1% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation[edit]

Elkhorn was a stop on the Racine & Southwestern branch line of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad, better known as the Milwaukee Road. In its 1980 bankruptcy, the Milwaukee Road disposed of the Southwestern Line. The Wisconsin & Southern continues to service Elkhorn from a connection at Bardwell to the west.[16]

Notable people[edit]

Images[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "History". cityofelkhorn.org. Retrieved 24 February 2021.
  2. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  5. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  6. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  10. ^ Henry Gannett (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 117.
  11. ^ "History". City of Elkhorn. Archived from the original on 16 June 2017. Retrieved 15 June 2017.
  12. ^ Editor (4 Sep 1874) “Remarkable Cure.” Brainerd Tribune, Vol 3 No 30. Page 1. (Retrieved November 13, 2019).
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-12-02. Retrieved 2009-03-11.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  14. ^ Godfrey, Linda S. (2003). The Beast of Bray Road: Tailing Wisconsin's Werewolf. Black Earth, Wisconsin: Prairie Oak Press. ISBN 9781879483910. 53090741
  15. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  16. ^ "Elkhorn Railroad History and Photos". glenviewcreek.com. Retrieved 19 April 2018.
  17. ^ Wisconsin Blue Book 1973, p. 50

External links[edit]