Elkhorn (sculpture)

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Elkhorn
Elkhorn is located in Portland, Oregon
Elkhorn
Elkhorn
Location in Portland, Oregon
ArtistLee Kelly
Year1978–1979 (1978–1979)
TypeSculpture
SubjectDeer
Dimensions3.0 m × 2.4 m × 2.4 m (10 ft × 8 ft × 8 ft)
Condition"Treatment needed" (1993)
LocationWest Haven-Sylvan, Oregon, United States
Coordinates45°30′39″N 122°46′01″W / 45.51083°N 122.76693°W / 45.51083; -122.76693Coordinates: 45°30′39″N 122°46′01″W / 45.51083°N 122.76693°W / 45.51083; -122.76693

Elkhorn is an outdoor 1979 sculpture by Lee Kelly, installed at Catlin Gabel School in West Haven-Sylvan, a census-designated place in Washington County and the Portland metropolitan area, in the U.S. state of Oregon.

Description[edit]

Lee Kelly's Elkhorn is a welded Cor-Ten steel sculpture installed west of Toad Hall at Catlin Gabel School in West Haven-Sylvan, Oregon. It was designed in 1978, the year his son with Bonnie Bronson, Jason,[1] died of leukemia. The sculpture was commissioned by Kelly's friends,[1] and dedicated in 1979 in his son's memory.[2][3] The abstract, geometric work depicts a deer and features a three rectangular legs supporting a rectangular platform, with another rectangular shape suspended underneath the platform. It measures approximately 10 feet (3.0 m) x 8 feet (2.4 m) x 8 feet (2.4 m). The sculpture's north leg has an inscription that reads Lee Kelly / 1978 and a plaque with the text, ELKHORN / IN MEMORY OF / JASON KELLY / PLACED HERE BY HIS FRIENDS / JUNE 1979.[2]

The sculpture is administered by Catlin Gabel School. It was surveyed and deemed "treatment needed" by the Smithsonian Institution's "Save Outdoor Sculpture!" program in November 1993.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gleason, Norma Catherine; Orloff, Chet (1983). Portland's Public Art: A Guide and History. Portland, Oregon: Western Imprints. p. 18. ISBN 0875950590. OCLC 9645405.
  2. ^ a b c "Elkhorn, (sculpture)". Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved September 7, 2015.
  3. ^ Row, D.K. (October 9, 2010). "Profile: Northwest sculptor Lee Kelly". The Oregonian. Retrieved March 2, 2014.