Elotuzumab

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Elotuzumab
Monoclonal antibody
Type Whole antibody
Source Humanized
Target SLAMF7 (CD319)
Clinical data
Trade names Empliciti
License data
Pregnancy
category
  • US: X (Contraindicated)
Routes of
administration
IV
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 100% (IV)
Identifiers
CAS Number
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
  • none
UNII
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C6476H9982N1714O2016S42
Molar mass 145.5 kg/mol
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Elotuzumab (brand name Empliciti, (Bristol-Myers Squibb and AbbVie), previously known as HuLuc63) is a humanized monoclonal antibody used in relapsed multiple myeloma.[1] The package insert denotes its mechanism as a SLAMF7-directed (also known as CD 319) immunostimulatory antibody.[2]

Approvals and indications[edit]

Multiple myeloma[edit]

In May 2014, it was granted "Breakthrough Therapy" designation by the FDA (for multiple myeloma).[3] On November 30, 2015, FDA approved elotuzumab as a treatment for patients with multiple myeloma who have received one to three prior medications.[1] Elotuzumab was labeled for use with lenalidomide and dexamethasone. Each intravenous injection of elotuzumab should be premedicated with dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, ranitidine and acetaminophen.[2] In May 2016 the EC/EU gave a similar approval.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Press Announcement—FDA approves Empliciti, a new immune-stimulating therapy to treat multiple myeloma". U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved 3 December 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "Empliciti (elotuzumab) for Injection, for Intravenous Use. Full Prescribing Information" (PDF). Empliciti (elotuzumab) for US Healthcare Professionals. Princeton, New Jersey: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-12-08. 
  3. ^ "Bristol-Myers Squibb and AbbVie Receive U.S. FDA Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Elotuzumab, an Investigational Humanized Monoclonal Antibody for Multiple Myeloma" (Press release). Princeton, New Jersey and North Chicago, Illinois: Bristol-Myers Squibb. 2014-05-19. Retrieved 2015-02-05. 
  4. ^ BMS gets two new cancer approvals in Europe. May 2016

External links[edit]