Elrhaz Formation

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Elrhaz Formation
Stratigraphic range: Aptian-Albian
Gadoufaoua.png
Outcrops of the formation
Type Geological formation
Unit of Tegama Group
Underlies Echkar Formation
Overlies Tazolé Formation
Location
Country  Niger

The Elrhaz Formation is a geological formation in Niger, central Africa.

Its strata date back to the Early Cretaceous (late Aptian-early Albian stages, about 112 million years ago). Dinosaur remains are among the fossils that have been recovered from the formation, alongside those of multiple species of crocodyliformes.

Vertebrate paleofauna[edit]

Crocodyliformes[edit]

Crocodyliformes reported from the Elrhaz Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Material Notes Images

Araripesuchus[1]

A. wegeneri[1]

"nearly complete skull" - Sereno & Larsson (1999)

The giant Crocodyliform Sarcosuchus

Anatosuchus[1]

A. minor[1]

"nearly complete skull" - Sereno & Larsson (1999)

Sarcosuchus[2] S. imperator "partial skeletons, numerous skulls"

Ornithischians[edit]

Ornithischians reported from the Elrhaz Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Material Notes Images

Lurdusaurus[1]

L. arenatus[1]

"Partial skull, fragmentary postcranial skeleton."[3]

Ouranosaurus[1]

O. nigeriensis[1]

"Skull and poscrania, second skeleton."[4]

Elrhazosaurus[1]

E. nigeriensis[1]

"Femora."[5]

Saurischians[edit]

Saurischians reported from the Elrhaz Formation
Genus Species Location Stratigraphic position Material Notes Images

Eocarcharia[1]

E. dinops[6]

"Partial skull and postcranial remains."[7]

Carcharodontosaurid

Elaphrosaurus[1]

E. iguidensis[1]

No longer assigned to Elaphrosaurus

Nigersaurus[1]

N. taqueti[1]

Sauropod

Suchomimus[1]

S. tenerensis[1]

Partial skull and associated skeleton.[8]

A second, possible spinosaurid found in the formation, Cristatusaurus, is considered either a separate species or a synonym to Suchomimus[9]

Kryptops[1]

K. Palaios[1]

Postcranial skeleton and partial skull.[10]

Abelisaurid

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "68.1 Departement D'Agedez, Niger; 1. Elrhaz Formation," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 572.
  2. ^ Sereno, P. C.; Larsson, H. C.; Sidor, C. A.; Gado, B. (2001-11-16). "The giant crocodyliform Sarcosuchus from the Cretaceous of Africa". Science (New York, N.Y.). 294 (5546): 1516–1519. doi:10.1126/science.1066521. ISSN 0036-8075. PMID 11679634. 
  3. ^ "Table 19.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 416.
  4. ^ "Table 19.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 417.
  5. ^ "Table 19.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 415.
  6. ^ Sereno, Paul C.; and Brusatte, Stephen L. (2008). "Basal abelisaurid and carcharodontosaurid theropods from the Lower Cretaceous Elrhaz Formation of Niger" (pdf). Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 53 (1): 15–46. doi:10.4202/app.2008.0102.
  7. ^ "Table 4.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 73.
  8. ^ "Table 4.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2004). Page 72.
  9. ^ Rauhut, O.W.M. (2003). "The interrelationships and evolution of basal theropod dinosaurs". Special Papers in Palaeontology 69: 1-213.
  10. ^ "Table 4.1," in Weishampel, et al. (2008). Page 72.

References[edit]

  • Weishampel, David B.; Dodson, Peter; and Osmólska, Halszka (eds.): The Dinosauria, 2nd, Berkeley: University of California Press. 861 pp. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.