Elsinboro Township, New Jersey

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Elsinboro Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Elsinboro
Elsinboro Township highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Elsinboro Township highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Elsinboro Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Elsinboro Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°32′00″N 75°29′55″W / 39.533318°N 75.498478°W / 39.533318; -75.498478Coordinates: 39°32′00″N 75°29′55″W / 39.533318°N 75.498478°W / 39.533318; -75.498478[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Salem
Earliest mention May 12, 1701
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Sean Elwell (term ends December 31, 2014)[3][4]
 • Clerk Marty Uzdanovics[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 13.325 sq mi (34.511 km2)
 • Land 11.917 sq mi (30.865 km2)
 • Water 1.408 sq mi (3.646 km2)  10.57%
Area rank 182nd of 566 in state
11th of 15 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 1,036
 • Estimate (2014)[11] 1,009
 • Rank 532nd of 566 in state
15th of 15 in county[12]
 • Density 86.9/sq mi (33.6/km2)
 • Density rank 548th of 566 in state
12th of 15 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08079 - Salem[13]
Area code(s) 856[14]
FIPS code 3403321330[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882064[1][17]
Website www.elsinborotownship.com

Elsinboro Township is a township in Salem County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 1,036,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 56 (-5.1%) from the 1,092 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 78 (-6.7%) from the 1,170 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Elsinboro's first mention dates back to May 12, 1701, though it was also mentioned in records on November 28, 1676. The details and date of its original incorporation are unknown. The township was incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's original group of 104 townships.[19]

History[edit]

At the time of European colonization in the 17th century the Delaware River was known as the South River and the Salem River was known as Varkens Kill, or Hogg Creek.[20] In 1641, without having a patent, a group of 60 settlers (20 families) from the New Haven Colony (in today's Connecticut) purchased land along the kill from indigenous Lenape.[21][22][23]

Shortly after Johan Printz, governor of New Sweden, arrived in the colony in 1643, he instructed that Fort Nya Elfsborg be built.[24] Named after the old Älvsborg Fortress off shore from Gothenburg, Sweden, it was located on the Delaware River between Salem River and Alloway Creek. In 1655 Peter Stuyvesant, on behalf of the Dutch West India Company, re-asserted control over the region, which was later captured by the British in 1664.[25]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 13.325 square miles (34.511 km2), including 11.917 square miles (30.865 km2) of land and 1.408 square miles (3.646 km2) of water (10.57%).[1][2]

The Salem River flows along a portion of the township's northern boundary, and Alloway Creek flows along its southern boundary.[26] Elsinboro Township contains the site of former Fort Elfsborg. Money Island is located in the southwestern corner of the township.

Elsinboro Township borders Pennsville Township, Salem, and Lower Alloways Creek Township. Elsinboro also borders the Delaware Bay.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Elsinboro Neck, Elsinboro Point, Hagerville, Mill Creek Cove, Moores Corner, Oakwood Beach, and Sinnickson Landing.[citation needed][27]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 517
1820 505 −2.3%
1830 503 −0.4%
1840 526 4.6%
1850 655 24.5%
1860 749 14.4%
1870 700 −6.5%
1880 570 −18.6%
1890 524 −8.1%
1900 445 −15.1%
1910 419 −5.8%
1920 374 −10.7%
1930 405 8.3%
1940 663 63.7%
1950 674 1.7%
1960 1,220 81.0%
1970 1,204 −1.3%
1980 1,290 7.1%
1990 1,170 −9.3%
2000 1,092 −6.7%
2010 1,036 −5.1%
Est. 2014 1,009 [11][28] −2.6%
Population sources: 1810-2000[29]
1810-1920[30] 1840[31] 1850-1870[32]
1850[33] 1870[34] 1880-1890[35]
1890-1910[36] 1910-1930[37]
1900-1990[38] 2000[39][40] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,036 people, 455 households, and 293 families residing in the township. The population density was 86.9 per square mile (33.6/km2). There were 524 housing units at an average density of 44.0 per square mile (17.0/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.05% (964) White, 3.47% (36) Black or African American, 0.10% (1) Native American, 0.39% (4) Asian, 0.10% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.06% (11) from other races, and 1.83% (19) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.22% (23) of the population.[8]

There were 455 households, of which 20.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.8% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.6% were non-families. 27.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.76.[8]

In the township, 18.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 22.0% from 25 to 44, 34.1% from 45 to 64, and 20.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48.6 years. For every 100 females there were 98.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.1 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $64,107 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,891) and the median family income was $73,333 (+/- $14,834). Males had a median income of $59,904 (+/- $5,192) versus $42,188 (+/- $14,368) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,008 (+/- $2,997). About 1.5% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.9% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[41]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 1,092 people, 468 households, and 324 families residing in the township. The population density was 89.0 people per square mile (34.4/km²). There were 530 housing units at an average density of 43.2 per square mile (16.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 95.05% White, 3.57% African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.27% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.64% of the population.[39][40]

There were 468 households out of which 24.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.7% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.80.[39][40]

In the township the population was spread out with 21.2% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 28.2% from 45 to 64, and 19.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 90.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.8 males.[39][40]

The median income for a household in the township was $50,972, and the median income for a family was $59,688. Males had a median income of $42,232 versus $30,357 for females. The per capita income for the township was $25,415. About 2.1% of families and 1.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.9% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.[39][40]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Elsinboro Township is governed under the Township form of government with a three-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][42] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor.

As of 2015, members of the Elsinboro Township Committee are Mayor Sean Elwell (R, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2015), Deputy Mayor John J. Elk (R, term on committee ends 2017; term as deputy mayor ends 2015) and Doug Hogate (D, 2016).[3][43][44][45][46]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Elsinboro Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[47] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[9][48][49]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[50] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[51] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[52][53]

The 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Celeste Riley (D, Bridgeton).[54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56]

Salem County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders who are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2014, Salem County's Freeholders (with party, residence, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Director Julie A. Acton (R, Pennsville Township, 2016; Administration), Deputy Director Dale A. Cross (R, Pennsville Township, 2014; Public Safety), Bruce L. Bobbitt (D, Pilesgrove Township, 2014; Public Services), Ben Laury (R, Elmer, 2015; Public Works) Beth E. Timberman (D, Woodstown, 2015; Social Services), Robert J. Vanderslice (R, Pennsville Township, 2014; Health and Human Services) Lee R. Ware (D, Elsinboro Township, 2016; Transportation, Agriculture and Cultural Affairs).[57][58] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Gilda T. Gill (2014),[59] Sheriff Charles M. Miller (2015)[60] and Surrogate Nicki A. Burke (2015).[61][62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 849 registered voters in Elsinboro Township, of which 234 (27.6% vs. 30.6% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 221 (26.0% vs. 21.0%) were registered as Republicans and 392 (46.2% vs. 48.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[63] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 81.9% (vs. 64.6% in Salem County) were registered to vote, including 99.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 84.4% countywide).[63][64]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 59.2% of the vote (374 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 38.3% (242 votes), and other candidates with 2.5% (16 votes), among the 636 ballots cast by the township's 872 registered voters (4 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 72.9%.[65][66] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 386 votes (58.3% vs. 46.6% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 248 votes (37.5% vs. 50.4%) and other candidates with 16 votes (2.4% vs. 1.6%), among the 662 ballots cast by the township's 870 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.1% (vs. 71.8% in Salem County).[67] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 421 votes (61.2% vs. 52.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 262 votes (38.1% vs. 45.9%) and other candidates with 4 votes (0.6% vs. 1.0%), among the 688 ballots cast by the township's 875 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.6% (vs. 71.0% in the whole county).[68]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 71.1% of the vote (356 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 26.9% (135 votes), and other candidates with 2.0% (10 votes), among the 504 ballots cast by the township's 861 registered voters (3 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 58.5%.[69][70] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 266 votes (50.9% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 178 votes (34.0% vs. 39.9%), Independent Chris Daggett with 69 votes (13.2% vs. 9.7%) and other candidates with 7 votes (1.3% vs. 2.0%), among the 523 ballots cast by the township's 877 registered voters, yielding a 59.6% turnout (vs. 47.3% in the county).[71]

Education[edit]

The Elsinboro Township School District public school students in Kindergarten through eighth grade at Elsinboro Township School. As of the 2012-13 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 121 students and 11.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.17:1.[72]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Salem High School in Salem City, together with students from Lower Alloways Creek Township, Mannington Township and Quinton Township, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Salem City School District.[73][74][75]

Transportation[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 24.13 miles (38.83 km) of roadways, of which 7.67 miles (12.34 km) were maintained by the municipality and 16.46 miles (26.49 km) by Salem County.[76]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Elsinboro Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mayor and Township Committee, Elsinboro Township. Accessed June 21, 2015.
  4. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed February 17, 2015. As of date accessed, Elwell is listed as mayor with a term-end year of 2014.
  5. ^ Departments, Elsinboro Township. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2006, p. 19.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Elsinboro, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Elsinboro township, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Elsinboro township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 17, 2013.
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  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Salem, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Salem County, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed February 17, 2015.
  15. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
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  22. ^ Sheridan, Janet L. "Their Houses are Some Built of Timber": The Colonial Timber Frame Houses of Fenwick's Colony, New Jersey, p. 48. University of Delaware. School of Urban Affairs and Public Policy, 2007. ISBN 9780549186526. Accessed February 17, 2015.
  23. ^ Howe, Henry; Barber, John W. (1844), Salem, NJ, New York: S. Tuttle, In 1641, some English families, (probably emigrants from New Haven, Conn.,) embracing about 60 persons, settled on Ferken's creek, (now Salem.) About this period, the Swedes bought of the Indians the whole district from Cape May to Raccoon creek; and, in order to unite these English with the Swedes, the Swedish governor, Printz, who arrived from Sweden the year after (1642), was to "act kindly and faithfully toward them; and as these English expected soon, by further arrivals, to increase their numbers to several hundreds, and seemed also willing to be subjects of the Swedish government, he was to receive them under allegiance, though not without endeavoring to effect their removal." 
  24. ^ History of Elsinboro
  25. ^ Weslager, C. A. (1988). New Sweden on the Delaware 1638-1655. Wilmington: The Middle Atlantic Press. 
  26. ^ DeLorme (2005). New Jersey Atlas & Gazetteer. Yarmouth, Maine: DeLorme. ISBN 0-89933-324-9.
  27. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  28. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  29. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Salem County Municipalities, 1810 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed January 17, 2013.
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  32. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 254, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed January 17, 2013. "Elisinboro' is the smallest township in the county, containing only seven hundred inhabitants.... The population is less than it was ten years ago, for in 1850 it was 655; in 1860, 749; and in 1870 but 700."
  33. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 140. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  34. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  35. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  36. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  37. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  38. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  39. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Elsinboro township, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  40. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Elsinboro township, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  41. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Elsinboro township, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  42. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  43. ^ 2015 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Elsinboro Township. Accessed June 21, 2015.
  44. ^ Wehner, Brittany M. "Newcomer Douglas Hogate sworn in, Elwell re-appointed as mayor during Elsinboro 2014 reorganization meeting", South Jersey Times, January 2, 2014. "Sean Elwell was re-appointed as mayor and Douglas Hogate was sworn in as committeeman at Wednesday morning’s reorganization meeting.The new year brought in newcomer Hogate, who is a Democrat, after he beat out former committeeman Jeff Stepler during the November election."
  45. ^ Wehner, Brittany M. "Elwell sworn in for 3rd term on Elsinboro Township Committee, appointed mayor", South Jersey Times, January 1, 2013. Accessed May 26, 2015. "Gathered in the township municipal building to swear-in Republican Sean Elwell, neighbors and county supporters applauded as Elwell took oath of office.... The three-member township committee is currently comprised of all Republicans."
  46. ^ Staff. "Salem County election results 2014", South Jersey Times, November 4, 2014. Accessed January 16, 2015.
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  49. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  50. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  51. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  52. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  53. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
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  64. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 17, 2013.
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  67. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Salem County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed January 17, 2013.
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  71. ^ 2009 Governor: Salem County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed January 17, 2013.
  72. ^ District information for Elsinboro Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 17, 2015.
  73. ^ Our Sending Districts, Salem City School District (New Jersey). Accessed December 8, 2014. "Salem High School welcomes students from: Elsinboro Township School; Lower Alloways Creek School; Mannington Township School; Quinton Township School"
  74. ^ Bumpus, Robert L. Salem County Report on Consolidation and Regionalization, Salem County, New Jersey Executive County Superintendent, March 15, 2010. Accessed December 8, 2014. "In this area of Salem County four P-8 districts, Lower Alloway Creek, Quinton, Elsinboro, and Mannington Townships have a send/receive agreement with neighboring Salem City to send their students to Salem High School."
  75. ^ Salem County Education, Discover Salem County. Accessed December 8, 2014. "Students from Elsinboro, Lower Alloways Creek Township, Mannington Township and Quinton Township attend the district's high school for grades 9-12 as part of sending/receiving relationships."
  76. ^ Salem County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 24, 2014.
  77. ^ George Hires profile, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 13, 2007.

External links[edit]