Embassy of Switzerland in New Zealand

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Embassy of Switzerland
in New Zealand
Foto der Residenz.jpg
LocationWellington
AddressLevel 12, Maritime Tower
10 Customhouse Quay
Wellington 6011
New Zealand
Coordinates41°16′56″S 174°46′43″E / 41.28222°S 174.77861°E / -41.28222; 174.77861Coordinates: 41°16′56″S 174°46′43″E / 41.28222°S 174.77861°E / -41.28222; 174.77861
AmbassadorDavid Vogelsanger
WebsiteOfficial Website

The Embassy of Switzerland in New Zealand (German: Schweizerische Botschaft in Neuseeland, French: Ambassade de Suisse en Nouvelle-Zélande, Italian: Ambasciata di Svizzera in Nuova Zelanda) is the official representation of Switzerland in New Zealand and in a number of Pacific island countries.

The Chancery is located in the Maritime Tower, a modern seventeen storey office building overlooking the Wellington Harbour. The building was completed in 2006.[1] Until 2009 the location had been on Panama Street. The Residence is a historical building in Woburn, Lower Hutt, 15 kilometers from the Wellington city center.

The Embassy’s Tasks[edit]

The Embassy is responsible for diplomatic relations between Switzerland, New Zealand, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu and the Cook Islands. It represents Swiss political, consular, economic, financial, legal, scientific and cultural interests.[2] The Embassy is also consular representation for Niue and American Samoa, the Ambassador serving as Consul General in this United States territory.[3]

Around 7,000 Swiss citizens live in New Zealand, the highest proportion in any country in the world. The Embassy offers the whole range of consular services to this population.[4] It is supported in its consular and diplomatic work by subordinate posts lead by Honorary Consuls, the Consulate of Switzerland in Auckland[5], the Consulate General in Suva, Fiji[6], the Consulate General in Apia, Samoa[7], and the Consulate General in Nuku'alofa, Tonga[8].

The following table shows the numbers of Swiss citizens living in these countries.

Country Registered Swiss Citizens Date
New Zealand 7047 2017
Fiji 37 2017
Samoa 18 2017
Tonga 13 2017
Tuvalu 0 2017
Cook Islands 19 2017

(Source: website of the Swiss Confederation[9])

History[edit]

The first representation of Switzerland in New Zealand was a Consulate established in 1912, initially located in Auckland but relocated to Wellington in 1937. Walter Schmid was from 1937 the first career consular officer heading the post. In 1955, the representation was upgraded to a Consulate General and diplomat Pierre Aubaret became the first Consul General. After having established diplomatic relations with New Zealand in 1962, the representation became an Embassy. Jean-Pierre Weber was its first Chargé d'affaires from 1963. In 1966, the Consulate in Auckland was reopened with an honorary consul in charge. Max Corti was the first Swiss resident Ambassador to New Zealand from 1969.[10]

In 2007 (Samoa), 2012 (Fiji) and 2017 (Tonga) Switzerland extended its representative network in the region by opening Consulates General with an honorary consul general heading the post.[10]

After the establishment of diplomatic relations with New Zealand[11], Switzerland took this step in 1985 with the Kingdom of Tonga[12], in 1987 with Western Samoa, today Samoa[13], in 1989 with the Republic of Fiji[14], in 2005 with Tuvalu[15] and in 2010 with the Cook Islands, a self governing territory in free association with New Zealand[16].

Swiss Representatives[edit]

The current Ambassador of Switzerland in Wellington is David Vogelsanger. He also serves as Consul General of Switzerland to American Samoa, a United States Territory.[17]

The following Swiss representatives have served in New Zealand, Fiji, Samoa and Tonga.

Representatives in Wellington, New Zealand[edit]

Name Term Rank
Walter Schmid 1937-1946 Consul
Ernst Theiler 1946-1949 Consul
Henri Blanchard 1949-1955 Consul
Pierre Aubaret 1955-1959 Consul General
Oscar Rossetti 1959-1963 Consul General
Jean-Pierre Weber 1963-1967 Chargé d'affaires
Paul Erb 1967-1969 Chargé d'affaires
Max Corti 1969-1974 Ambassador
Fritz Adams 1975-1979 Chargé d'affaires
Walter Sollberger 1979-1982 Chargé d'affaires
Ivan Etienne 1982-1987 Chargé d'affaires
Fridolin Wyss 1987-1989 Chargé d'affaires
Michael von Schenk 1989-1993 Ambassador
Ernst Thurnheer 1993-1996 Ambassador
Walter Simmen 1996-2000 Chargé d'affaires
Sylvie Matteucci 2000-2005 Ambassador
Beat Nobs 2005-2010 Ambassador
Marion Weichelt 2010-2014 Ambassador
David Vogelsanger 2014-2019 Ambassador
MW 2019- Ambassador

(Source: website of the Swiss Confederation[10])

Representatives in Auckland, New Zealand[edit]

Name Term Rank
Georg Streiff 1912-1917 Honorary Consul
Walter John Pugh 1917-1918 Honorary Consul
John Andrew Charles Allum 1926-1933 Consular Agent
Albert Blau 1933-1936 Consular Agent
Ernest Merz 1966-1970 Consular Agent
Arthur Müller 1970-1994 Honorary Consul
Peter Deutschle 1994-2018 Honorary Consul
Adrian Blaser 2019- Honorary Consul

(Source: website of the Swiss Confederation[10])

Of particular historical interest is Sir John Allum CBE who served as Mayor of Auckland from 1941 to 1952 and is remembered as father of the famous Auckland Harbour Bridge.

Representatives in Suva, Fiji[edit]

Name Term Rank
Rolf Gfeller 2012- Honorary Consul General

(Source: website of the Swiss Confederation[10])

Representatives in Apia, Samoa[edit]

Name Term Rank
Marco Kappenberger 2007-2012 Honorary Consul General
Sylvie Salanoa 2013- Honorary Consul General

(Source: website of the Swiss Confederation[10])

Representatives in Nuku'alofa, Kingdom of Tonga[edit]

Name Term Rank
Carl Henry Sanft 2017- Honorary Consul General

(Source: website of the Swiss Confederation[10])

Swiss Citizens[edit]

John Webber (1751-1793), Thomas Brunner (1821–1874) and Jakob Lauper (1815-1891) are notable New Zealand pioneers of Swiss descent. John Webber was the first Swiss who ever set his foot on New Zealand soil. He accompanied Captain James Cook on his third and final Pacific (1776-79) voyage as the expedition's Artist.[18] London-born Swiss explorer Thomas Brunner arrived in New Zealand in 1841. He is known for his extensive expeditions on the west coast of the South Island.[19] The town of Brunner, Lake Brunner, Mount Brunner and Brunner Mine were all named after him. Lauper Stream, Lauper Peak and Lauper Bivouac, all situated on the upper Rakaia River on the South Island, remember Jakob Lauper (1815-1891)[18], gold prospector and explorer, who, together with John Henry Withcombe, had been in 1863 the first European to cross the Southern Alps. The first Swiss farmer who settled in Taranaki in 1870 was Felix Hunger (1837-1918).

There are five Swiss clubs in New Zealand, in Auckland[20], in Hamilton[21], in Taranaki[22], in Wellington[23] and in Christchurch. The first four clubs are situated on the North Island and form the Swiss Society of New Zealand which publishes its own magazine "Helvetia" since 1935[24].

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Maritime Office Tower. Warren and Mahoney. Accessed 28.10.2016.
  2. ^ Embassy of Switzerland in New Zealand - The Tasks of the Embassy. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 28.10.2016.
  3. ^ Embassy of Switzerland in New Zealand. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 28.10.2016.
  4. ^ Switzerland - Our relationship with Switzerland. New Zealand Foreign Affairs and Trade. Accessed 31.10.2016.
  5. ^ Embassy of Switzerland, Wellington, New Zealand - Staff Details. New Zealand Foreign Affairs and Trade. Accessed 31.10.2016.
  6. ^ Honorary Consuls in Fiji - Switzerland. Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Fiji. Accessed 31.10.2016.
  7. ^ Overseas Honorary Consuls in Samoa - Switzerland. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Samoa. Accessed 31.10.2016.
  8. ^ Swiss representation in Tonga - Switzerland. Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Fiji. Accessed 24.10.2017.
  9. ^ Im Ausland niedergelassene Schweizer nach Wohnstaaten und -gebieten. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 29.11.2017.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g Embassy of Switzerland in New Zealand - History. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 28.10.2016.
  11. ^ Bilateral relations Switzerland–New Zealand - History of bilateral relations. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 3.11.2016.
  12. ^ Bilateral relations Switzerland–Tonga - History of bilateral relations. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 28.10.2016.
  13. ^ Bilateral relations Switzerland–Samoa - History of bilateral relations. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 28.10.2016.
  14. ^ Bilateral relations Switzerland–Fiji - History of bilateral relations. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 28.10.2016.
  15. ^ Bilateral relations Switzerland–Tuvalu - History of bilateral relations. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 28.10.2016.
  16. ^ Bilateral relations Switzerland–Cook Islands - History of bilateral relations. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 28.10.2016.
  17. ^ Curriculum Vitae David Vogelsanger. Website of the Swiss Confederation. Accessed 28.10.2016.
  18. ^ a b Neuseeland. Historisches Lexikon der Schweiz. Accessed 2.11.2016.
  19. ^ Story: Brunner, Thomas. Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Accessed 3.11.2016.
  20. ^ Auckland Swiss Club. Website of the Swiss Society of New Zealand. Accessed 31.10.2016.
  21. ^ Hamilton Swiss Club. Website of the Swiss Society of New Zealand. Accessed 31.10.2016.
  22. ^ Taranaki Swiss Club. Website of the Swiss Society of New Zealand. Accessed 31.10.2016.
  23. ^ Wellington Swiss Club. Website of the Swiss Society of New Zealand. Accessed 31.10.2016.
  24. ^ Helvetia. Website of the Swiss Society of New Zealand. Accessed 27.11.2017.

External Links[edit]