Embrace (American band)

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Not to be confused with Embrace (English band).
Embrace
EmbraceAmericanBand 1985.jpeg
Embrace at Food for Thought on July 28, 1985. From left to right are Chris Bald, Ian MacKaye, and Mike Hampton. Drummer Ivor Hanson, while was present at the time, does not appear in the image.
Background information
Origin Washington, D.C., United States
Genres
Years active 1985–1986
Labels Dischord
Associated acts
Past members

Embrace was a short-lived post-hardcore band from Washington, D.C., which lasted from the summer of 1985 to the spring of 1986 and was one of the first bands to be dubbed in the press as emotional hardcore,[6] though the members had rejected the term since its creation.[6][7][8] The band included lead vocalist Ian MacKaye of the defunct act Minor Threat with three former members of his brother Alec's band, the Faith: guitarist Michael Hampton, drummer Ivor Hanson, and bassist Chris Bald.[7] Hampton and Hanson had also previously played together in S.O.A.[9] The only recording released by the quartet was their self-titled album Embrace, being influenced by the Faith EP Subject to Change.[7][10] The band played their last show at the 9:30 Club in March 1986.[11][12]

Following the breakup of Embrace,[13] MacKaye and ex-Minor Threat drummer, Jeff Nelson, tried turning their recent one-off musical experiment in England, dubbed "Egg Hunt", into an actual band,[14] but the project never surpassed the rehearsal stage.[15][16][17] Hampton, for his part, teamed up with former members of Rites of Spring to form the short-lived post-hardcore outfit One Last Wish, while Bald moved on to the band Ignition. MacKaye eventually directed his energy and creativity toward the forming of Fugazi in 1987,[15][17][18] and Ivor Hanson would pair up with Hampton again in 1988 for Manifesto.[19]

During the band's formative years, some fans started referring to them and fellow innovators Rites of Spring as emocore (emotive hardcore) bands, a term MacKaye publicly disagreed with.[6][8][20]

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Compilation appearances[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Embrace". Allmusic. Retrieved 2012-12-03. 
  2. ^ a b c "Embrace – Album Review". Allmusic. Retrieved December 3, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Embrace". Punk News. Retrieved 2012-12-03. 
  4. ^ "The Subgenres of Punk Rock". Ryan Cooper. Retrieved 2012-12-03. 
  5. ^ "what exactly is 'emo,' anyway?". Helen A.S. Popkin. Retrieved 2012-12-03. 
  6. ^ a b c Andersen, Mark; Jenkins, Mark (Soft Skull Press, 2001). Dance of Days: Two Decades of Punk in the Nation's Capital. Updated ed., 2009. Akashic Books. ISBN 9781933354996. p. 202.
  7. ^ a b c Cogan, p. 97
  8. ^ a b Ritesofspr (August 17, 2006). Ian MacKaye - 1986 - Emocore is stupid. YouTube. Retrieved September 27, 2016.
  9. ^ Cogan, pp. 306-07
  10. ^ "Subject to Change 12" EP". Kill from the Heart. Retrieved 2012-08-11. 
  11. ^ Andersen, Mark; Jenkins, Mark (Soft Skull Press, 2001). Dance of Days: Two Decades of Punk in the Nation's Capital. Updated ed., 2009. Akashic Books. ISBN 9781933354996. pp. 202-203.
  12. ^ Zararity (December 29, 2014). Embrace - Live at the 9:30 Club, Washington, D.C. 1986 (Complete and remastered). YouTube. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
  13. ^ Andersen, Mark; Jenkins, Mark (Soft Skull Press, 2001). Dance of Days: Two Decades of Punk in the Nation's Capital. Updated ed., 2009. Akashic Books. ISBN 9781933354996. pp. 206-207.
  14. ^ Cogan, p. 96
  15. ^ a b DePasquale, Ron. "Egg Hunt: Artist Biography by Ron DePasquale". AllMusic. Retrieved September 26, 2016.
  16. ^ Egg Hunt. Dischord Records. Retrieved September 26, 2016.
  17. ^ a b Tyler, Vile. "Jeff Nelson of Dischord Records". Punk Globe. Retrieved September 26, 2016.
  18. ^ Rabid, Jack. "Me and You: AllMusic Review by Jack Rabid". allmusic.com. Retrieved September 26, 2016.
  19. ^ Cogan, p. 103
  20. ^ "Hearts of Darkness". Architectural Digest: 78–81. 2008. 

References and bibliography[edit]

Cogan, Brian (2008). The Encyclopedia of Punk. Sterling. ISBN 978-1-4027-5960-4. 

External links[edit]