Emmanuel Iduma

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Emmanuel Iduma
Emmanuel Iduma.jpg
Emmanuel Iduma
Born
Emmanuel Iduma

1989
Nigeria
NationalityNigerian
EducationObafemi Awolowo University
OccupationWriter, editor, art critic
Websitewww.mriduma.com

Emmanuel Iduma (born 1989) is a Nigerian writer, editor, publisher, and art critic. He is the co-founder of Saraba Magazine and the author of The Sound of Things to Come (2012). He teaches in the MFA Art Writing Program at School of Visual Arts, New York City.

Career[edit]

Iduma was born in Nigeria in 1989 to a preacher and schoolteacher.[1][2] He studied law for five years at the Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife. He also has an MFA in Art Criticism and Writing from the School of Visual Arts, New York City.

As an undergraduate, with fellow students Dami Ajayi and Ayobami Adebayo, he founded Saraba Magazine, its first issue being published in 2009. Saraba is now widely regarded as "one of Africa's biggest online literary magazines"[3] It launched its first print edition at the Aké Arts and Book Festival in November 2017.[4]

In December 2012, Parrésia Publishers published Iduma's first novel, Farad.[5] It is described by Tolu Ogunlesi as "an impressive house of words – dream-like, haunting, elusive – standing confidently at a frontier, signalling the immense promise of an emerging generation of Nigerian novelists."[6] BellaNaija says it "provides the right blend of emotion, perspective, history and introspection."[7] In 2016, the novel was republished in North America as The Sound of Things to Come.[8][9]

In March 2017, Iduma curated the first ever Nigerian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale with Adenrele Sonariwo[10][11][12][13]

He currently teaches in the MFA Art Writing Program at School of Visual Arts, New York City.[14]

List of publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The new, African magazine – for us, by us". Africa is a Country. 17 November 2017. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  2. ^ "#LiterallyWhatsHot: Well-Woven Collage or Distorted Narrative? – A Review of Emmanuel Iduma's "Farad" – BellaNaija". www.bellanaija.com. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  3. ^ Adeshokan, Oluwatosin. "The Online Journals Giving a Voice to Africa's New Writers". OZY. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  4. ^ Bivan, Nathaniel (1 October 2017). "'Saraba Magazine debuts print edition'".
  5. ^ Iduma, Emmanuel (21 December 2012). Farad. Parresia Books. ISBN 9789789220502.
  6. ^ "Emmanuel Iduma – Parrésia Publishers". parresiablog.wordpress.com. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  7. ^ "#LiterallyWhatsHot: Well-Woven Collage or Distorted Narrative? – A Review of Emmanuel Iduma's "Farad" – BellaNaija". www.bellanaija.com. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  8. ^ "The Sound of Things to Come by Emmanuel Iduma". World Literature Today. 14 February 2017. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  9. ^ "The Sound of Things to Come". www.mantlethought.org. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  10. ^ Africanartswithtaj (22 March 2017). "African Arts with Taj: Yes, Nigeria Goes To Venice Art Biennale". African Arts with Taj. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  11. ^ "Nigerian arts make historical appearance in Venice – Vanguard News". Vanguard News. 10 April 2017. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  12. ^ "56 editions after, Nigeria debuts at Venice Biennale – Premium Times Nigeria". Premium Times Nigeria. 28 March 2017. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  13. ^ "Nigeria's debut at the most important art exhibition in the world – La Biennale di Venezia". BusinessDay : News you can trust. 16 May 2017. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  14. ^ "The new, African magazine – for us, by us". Africa is a Country. 17 November 2017. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  15. ^ Iduma, Emmanuel; Randol, Shaun, eds. (1 January 2016). Gambit: Newer African Writing (2 ed.). The Mantle. ISBN 978-0-9965770-7-6.