End Violence Against Women Coalition

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End Violence Against Women Coalition
Abbreviation EVAW
Formation 2 November 2005 (2005-11-02)
Type Charity
Registration no. 1161132
(Charity Commission)
Purpose Campaigns to end all forms of violence against women
Headquarters 17–25 New Inn Yard, London, EC2A 3EA, United Kingdom
Co-chair
Liz Kelly
Co-chair
Marai Larasi
Website www.endviolenceagainstwomen.org.uk

End Violence Against Women Coalition (EVAW) is a UK-based coalition of individuals and organisations which campaigns to end all forms of violence against women. It was founded in 2005 and became a registered charity 31 March 2015.

History[edit]

The End Violence Against Women Coalition was originally established by the, now defunct, non-departmental public body (NDPB), the Women's National Commission (WNC), as a working group in early 2005. Initially it published "What a Waste: The Case for an Integrated Violence Against Women Strategy",[1] and in November of the same year it launched with the publication of "Making the Grade? An Independent Analysis of Government Initiatives on Violence Against Women", a survey of the work being done by central Government in the UK on violence against women, and highlighting the gaps in the provision of services.[2][3]

On 31 March 2015 the coalition became a registered charity,[4] co-chaired by Liz Kelly and Marai Larasi.[5]

Members[edit]

Campaign goals[edit]

The campaign goals of EVAW are:

  1. Ensure that national, regional and local governments in the UK take all steps necessary to prevent and eliminate violence against women and girls.
  2. Enable individuals and organisations to become part of a movement to eliminate violence against women and girls.
  3. Have violence against women understood as a cause and consequence of women’s inequality and a violation of human rights.
  4. Share information and innovative practice around the UK to develop campaign strategies and provide a coherent voice to governments.[34]

Evidence to the Leveson inquiry[edit]

EVAW, Eaves, Equality Now and Object gave joint evidence to the Leveson Inquiry, a judicial public inquiry into the culture, practices and ethics of the British press following the News International phone hacking scandal.[35][36]

Accompanying their evidence were three documents. The first detailed how, in their view, media reporting on violence against women and girls (VAWG) commonly upholds myths and stereotypes about VAWG, including victim blaming.[37] The second made recommendations to the inquiry about the reform of press regulation.[38] The final document, "Just the Women", was "an evaluation of eleven British national newspapers’ portrayal of women over a two-week period in September 2012, including recommendations on press regulation reform in order to reduce harm to, and discrimination against, women."[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Liz, Kelly; Lovett, Jo (February 2005). What a waste: the case for an integrated violence against women strategy. London: Department of Trade and Industry. OCLC 59352200.  Pdf.
  2. ^ Making the grade?: An independent analysis of government initiatives on violence against women. End Violence Against Women Coalition. November 2005.  Pdf. OCLC 778856134
  3. ^ Leader (25 November 2005). "Culture challenge". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  4. ^ "1161132 - End Violence Against Women Coalition". Charity Commission. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  5. ^ "Our people: our board of trustees". End Violence Against Women Coalition. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c "End Violence Against Women Coalition". Women's National Commission. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Members". End Violence Against Women Coalition. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  8. ^ a b "Campaigns & other resources – gender in education". Bristol Fawcett Society. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  9. ^ "Public art project for End Violence Against Women day". Bristol Feminist Network. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  10. ^ "BHA welcomes new findings in support of compulsory sex and relationships education". British Humanist Association. 24 May 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  11. ^ "Gender and Law at Durham (GLAD): The legal regulation of pornography". Durham University. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  12. ^ a b c End Violence Against Women Coalition; Eaves; Equality Now; OBJECT (November 2012). 'Just the women' (Report). Joint submission.  Pdf. Archived 2016-03-27 at the Wayback Machine.
  13. ^ "Partnerships: National Partnerships". Forward. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  14. ^ "Women's groups respond to Charlotte Church calling out sexism in the music industry". imkaan. 15 October 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g Kelly, Liz; Lovett, Jo (Autumn 2005). "Campaigning to end violence against women". Safe. Women's Aid. 15. Archived from the original on 2015-10-07. 
  16. ^ "News: Professor Sylvia Walby calls for urgent overhaul of domestic violence crime statistics". End Violence Against Women Coalition. 11 June 2015. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  17. ^ "Women members: useful links". NASUWT. Archived from the original on 7 October 2015. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  18. ^ "End Violence Against Women (EVAW)". Rape Crisis England and Wales. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  19. ^ "Links to useful organisations and information sources: campaigns and policy". Rape Crisis (Scotland). Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  20. ^ "History: raising survivor voices". Rape Crisis (South London). Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  21. ^ "Warning signs campaign supporters: Professor Liz Kelly, Chair of the End Violence Against Women (EVAW) Campaign". Refuge. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  22. ^ Vlais, Rodney (28 July 2015). "Dissolving borders in the struggle to end men's violence against women: learning from the U.K." Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  23. ^ "Campaign with us: End Violence against Women". Rights of women. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  24. ^ "Response to the DfT & Rail North Transpennine Express Rail Franchise and Northern Rail Franchise Stakeholder Consultation: Women's Safety". RMT. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  25. ^ "Campaigns supported by SERICC: End Violence Against Women Coalition". South Essex Rape and Incest Crisis Centre (SERICC). Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  26. ^ "SBS and EVAW domestic violence strategy seminars". Southall Black Sisters. 6 February 2010. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  27. ^ "About us: campaigns". Surviving Economic Abuse. 6 February 2010. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  28. ^ Curtis, Jake (14 June 2013). "An opportunity missed - New Clause 20". Tender. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  29. ^ "EVAW poll reveals high levels of sexual harassment". UNISON, North East Derbyshire, Local Government Branch. May 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  30. ^ "EWAV logo". White Ribbon Campaign. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  31. ^ "Olympic organisers reject 'distasteful' information about violence against women". Womankind Worldwide. Archived from the original on 7 October 2015. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  32. ^ Green, Sarah (25 November 2014). "Eliminating violence against women". Young Women's Trust. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  33. ^ "Poll shows sexual harassment 'normal' in schools". Zero Tolerance. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  34. ^ "Our goals". endviolenceagainstwomen.org.uk. End Violence Against Women Coalition. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  35. ^ Alexandra, Topping (29 December 2011). "Leveson inquiry should address media sexism, women's groups demand". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  36. ^ "Leveson Inquiry hears about portrayal of women in press". BBC news. BBC. 24 January 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2015. 
  37. ^ End Violence Against Women Coalition; Eaves; Equality Now; OBJECT (January 2012). EVAW Coalition Submission to the Leveson Inquiry (Report). Joint submission.  Pdf.
  38. ^ End Violence Against Women Coalition; Eaves; Equality Now; OBJECT (July 2012). EVAW Coalition Second Submission to Leveson Inquiry (Report). Joint submission.  Pdf.

External links[edit]