Endcap

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Aisles in a supermarket with small sets of shelves on the end, receding from left to right. Atop each set of shelves is a large white on black sign with the price of an item for sale on those shelves. White on green signs with the types of products in the aisles hang from the high ceiling.
Endcaps at a Walmart store

In retail marketing, an endcap, or end cap, is a display for a product placed at the end of an aisle. It is perceived to give a brand a competitive advantage.[1] It is often available for lease to a manufacturer in a retail environment. Products placed on an endcap for sale will sell at a much faster pace than products not on the endcap. The display of products on the endcap is sometimes also called a feature.

Promotional shelves and retail fixtures[edit]

In addition to products displayed on the end of an aisle, promoted space on a retail shelf can be referred to as a fixtures. Companies will oftentimes purchase a smaller amount of shelf space before making the move to an endcap at the end of an aisle.

Construction[edit]

End caps are often built into the shelving or racks of the retail aisle system. Other retailers have an open space at the end of the aisle; an end cap is placed in that space, often on a pallet. Several design options are available.[2]

Most endcaps are made of printed corrugated fiberboard which is readily recyclable. Corrugated plastic is also used. Many endcaps and point of purchase displays are assembled by contract packagers.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Morehead (2015). "How the Endcap Dictates What You Buy at the Grocery Store". The Kitchen. Retrieved January 4, 2018. 
  2. ^ US 7,513,074, Glen, "Universal end cap for retail fixtures", published 2009 

External links[edit]