Endeavor (non-profit)

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Endeavor
TypeNon-profit
Founded1997
FoundersLinda Rottenberg and Peter Kellner
Headquarters,
United States
Area served
40+ affiliate offices in Latin America, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Africa, and Europe[1]
Key people
Linda Rottenberg (CEO)
Edgar Bronfman Jr. (chairman)
Adrian Garcia-Aranyos (president)
Revenue10,759,332 United States dollar (2016) Edit this on Wikidata
Number of employees
500+ worldwide
Websiteendeavor.org

Endeavor is an organization headquartered in New York City that supports entrepreneurs with potential for economic and social impact in their regions.[2] The organization provides the entrepreneurs in its network with services that help them grow ventures, create jobs, transform economies, and support future generations of entrepreneurs.[3]

History[edit]

Founded in 1997, Endeavor has supported over 50,000 candidates and selected 2,000+ entrepreneurs from 1,200 companies. Supported and mentored by a network of 3,500+ local and global business leaders, these entrepreneurs have created over 650,000 jobs and in 2016 generated $10 billion in revenues.[4] In 2001, Endeavor launched Endeavor Mexico and Time magazine recognized Endeavor's founders as among the "Top 100 Innovators for the 21st Century" in its November 5, 2001, issue.[5]

In 2002, the Schwab Foundation and the World Economic Forum endorsed Endeavor as one of 40 leading examples of social entrepreneurship from around the world.,[6] In 2007, MercadoLibre was the first Endeavor company to go public on NASDAQ.[citation needed]

In 2008, Wences Casares, one of the first Endeavor entrepreneurs, joined its board of directors.[7] In 2009, Endeavor co-founder Linda Rottenberg co-chairs the World Economic Forum on the Middle East, held in Egypt.[8] In the same year, Endeavor received a commitment of $10 million from the Omidyar Network.[9] Also in 2009, Endeavor launched its Mentor Capital Program, Global 25 Program, Endeavor Jordan, and Endeavor's Center for High-Impact Entrepreneurship research arm.[10]

Evaluation[edit]

As of June 1, 2019, Charity Navigator rates Endeavor as 4 out of 4 stars based on data from FY2017.[11][12]

Notable Endeavour Entrepreneurs[edit]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ "Endeavor Affiliates". January 2014. Archived from the original on June 27, 2015. Retrieved November 28, 2013.
  2. ^ "Wences Casares: Reluctant serial entrepreneur". USA Today. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  3. ^ "Early-stage venture accelerators nourish a network". Miami Today. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  4. ^ "The Justice". Thejusticeonline.com. Retrieved March 24, 2011.[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ Morse, Jodie (November 5, 2001). "Charity Without The Checks". Time. Archived from the original on March 7, 2008. Retrieved March 24, 2011.
  6. ^ "Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship - Profiles". Schwabfound.org. Archived from the original on March 17, 2013. Retrieved March 24, 2011.
  7. ^ [1] Archived January 6, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ World Economic Forum on the Middle East Archived April 30, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ "ON | Endeavor Receives $10 Million Commitment from Omidyar Network to Support High Impact Entrepreneurship in Emerging Markets". Omidyar.com. July 31, 2008. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved March 24, 2011.
  10. ^ "Endeavor brings Silicon Valley to South America's Southern Cone". VentureBeat. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  11. ^ "Charity Navigator - Rating for Endeavor". Charity Navigator. June 1, 2019. Archived from the original on May 31, 2020. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  12. ^ "Investor Consultant Company Advisor". Retrieved October 19, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  13. ^ "Guillaume". Endeavour. Retrieved August 11, 2019.