Endurantism

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Endurantism or endurance theory is a philosophical theory of persistence and identity. According to the endurantist view, material objects are persisting three-dimensional individuals wholly present at every moment of their existence, which goes with an A-theory of time. This conception of an individual as always present is opposed to perdurantism or four dimensionalism, which maintains that an object is a series of temporal parts or stages, requiring a B-theory of time. The use of "endure" and "perdure" to distinguish two ways in which an object can be thought to persist can be traced to David Lewis.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  • Zalta, Edward N. (ed.). "Temporal parts". Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • Lewis, D.K.. 1986. On the Plurality of Worlds Oxford: Blackwell
  • McKinnon, N. 2002. "The Endurance/Perdurance Distinction", The Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80:3 p. 288-306.
  • Merricks, T. 1999. "Persistence, Parts and Presentism", Noûs 33 p. 421-38.
  • Sider, T. 2001. Four-Dimensionalism Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • Zimmerman, D. 1996. "Persistence and Presentism", Philosophical Papers 25:2.