Energinet

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Energinet
Government-owned corporation
IndustryEnergy
GenreTransmission system operator
PredecessorEltra, Elkraft System, Elkraft Transmission, Gastra
Founded2005 (2005)
Headquarters,
Key people
Peder Østermark Andreasen (CEO)
ServicesPower and natural gas transmission
Revenue9.17B DKK (2009)
OwnerGovernment of Denmark (State ownership)
Number of employees
1150
SubsidiariesEltransmission.dk A/S
Gastransmission.dk A/S
Websitewww.energinet.dk

Energinet is the Danish national transmission system operator for electricity and natural gas. It is an independent public enterprise owned by the Danish state under the Ministry of Climate and Energy.[1] Energinet has some 1150 employees, and its headquarters are located in Erritsø near Fredericia in Jutland. The gas division is located in Ballerup near Copenhagen.

The main tasks are to ensure efficient operation and development of the national electricity and gas infrastructure as well as ensuring equal access for all users of the infrastructure.[2] Energinet also plays a role in developing a carbon dioxide free energy system in Denmark.

History[edit]

Energinet was created by a merger of power grid operators Eltra, Elkraft System and Elkraft Transmission, and by natural gas transmission system operator Gastra.[3] The merger took place on 24 August 2005 with retrospective effect from 1 January 2005.

Operations[edit]

External image
High voltage grid of Denmark

Energinet operates the 400 kV electricity transmission grid[4] and the gas transmission grid.[5] The company owns and operates also 132 kV[6] and 150 kV power grids ("Regionale Net") and the HVDC Great Belt Power Link, and it is a co-owner of the power interconnections with Sweden (Konti–Skan), Norway (Cross-Skagerrak) and Germany (Kontek).[7][8][9] A 700MW submarine power cable called COBRAcable to the Netherlands is planned with TenneT,[10][11] and a 1,400MW cable (Viking Link in 2022) to Britain is investigated with National Grid, expected to cost DKK 15 billion.[12][13] Cobra and Viking were put on the EU "Projects of Common Interest" list in November 2015, along with the Krieger offshore wind turbine cable to Germany.[14] Of the high voltage power lines on land, 25% were laid as underground cables in 2014.[15]

Energinet has a 20% stake in Nord Pool Spot AS (the largest electricity market in the world),[16] and, as of December 2012, 100% of the physical gas exchange Nord Pool Gas A/S.[17] It also owns a fiber-optic communication network and a gas storage facility, as well as a 20% stake[8] in European Market Coupling Company, a Central-West European cross-border electrical power trading joint venture due to begin operations on 9 November 2010.[18]

An electrical consumption support scheme dedicated to sustainable electricity producers in Denmark is administered by Energinet.[19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Experience of the Danish Transmission System Operator" (PDF). International Energy Agency. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 11 February 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help); Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. ^ Torben Normann Schulze. "Loven om Energinet redegør for virksomhedens formål og opgaver Archived 2016-01-30 at the Wayback Machine" Danish Energy Agency
  3. ^ "Natural gas in exact quantities". Force Technology. Archived from the original on 2007-05-13. Retrieved 24 June 2008. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  4. ^ Nielsen, Torben Glar (15 September 2010). "Electricity Division". Energinet. Archived from the original on 2 November 2010. Retrieved 3 October 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  5. ^ Hodal, Peter A. (15 September 2010). "Gas Division". Energinet. Archived from the original on 2 November 2010. Retrieved 3 October 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  6. ^ "DONG Energy Sells Transmission Network to Energinet". OilVoice. 2007-12-24. Retrieved 2010-10-03.
  7. ^ "Energinet SOV". Business Week. Retrieved 11 February 2010.
  8. ^ a b Røge, Anne Cecilie Nesager (15 September 2010). "The Energinet Group". Energinet. Archived from the original on 30 October 2010. Retrieved 3 October 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  9. ^ Gellert, Bjarne Christian. Electricity interconnections Archived 2013-02-09 at the Wayback Machine Energinet, 22 August 2011. Accessed: 6 December 2011.
  10. ^ "Planned electricity cable between the Netherlands and Denmark". TenneT. Retrieved 24 September 2010.[permanent dead link]
  11. ^ Torben Glar Nielsen. "Energinet has approved the business case for Cobra cable Archived 2014-02-04 at the Wayback Machine" Energinet, 13 January 2014. Accessed: 20 January 2014.
  12. ^ Isobel Rowley & Jesper N. Rasmussen. "National Grid and Energinet sign cooperation agreement on a first electricity interconnector between UK and Denmark Archived 2014-02-04 at the Wayback Machine" Energinet, 10 October 2013. Accessed: 10 October 2013.
  13. ^ Wittrup, Sanne. "740 kilometer elkabel skal sende dansk strøm til England" Ingeniøren, 28 September 2015. Accessed: 28 September 2015. Overview of power connections Archived 2015-10-04 at the Wayback Machine
  14. ^ "Union list of projects of common interest" 18 November 2015.
  15. ^ Wittrup, Sanne. "Så er alle de mindre luftledninger lagt i jorden" Ingeniøren, 19 December 2014. Accessed: 21 December 2014.
  16. ^ "Nord Pool - Organisation". Nord Pool ASA. Retrieved 24 June 2008.[dead link]
  17. ^ "Nord Pool Spot sells its 50% shares of Nord Pool Gas to Energinet". Energinet. Archived from the original on 27 September 2013. Retrieved 25 September 2013. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  18. ^ Confirmation of launch date Archived 2011-07-14 at the Wayback Machine European Market Coupling Company, 24 September 2010. Retrieved: 3 October 2010.
  19. ^ "Subject: State aid No N 354/2008 – Denmark Modification of the scheme 'Support to environmentally friendly electricity production' (N 602/2004)" (PDF). European Commission. Retrieved 11 February 2010.

External links[edit]