Energy in the United Arab Emirates

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Energy in the United Arab Emirates describes energy and electricity production, consumption and import in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). UAE has 7% of global proved oil reserves, about 100 billion barrels.[1] Primary energy use in 2009 in UAE was 693 TWh and 151 TWh per million persons.[2]

The UAE is currently transitioning from an electricity generation system nearly 100% powered by gas power plants (2010) to 100% powered by nuclear, solar and other renewables in order to substantially reduce its carbon emissions. It is also rolling out electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

Location

Overview[edit]

Energy in the United Arab Emirates[3]
Capita Prim. energy Production Export Electricity CO2-emission
Million TWh TWh TWh TWh Mt
2004 4.32 510 1,907 1,273 49.0 103
2007 4.37 601 2,074 1,267 70.5 131
2008 4.48 680 2,100 1,196 75.8 147
2009 4.60 693 1,963 1,084 79.5 147
2010 7.51 723 2,050 1,129 83.0 154
2012 7.89 769 2,211 1,246 83.8 166
2012R 9.21 785 2,260 1,252 93,7 171
2013 9.35 809 2,345 1,316 98,6 168
Change 2004-10 73.8 % 41.8 % 7.5 % 11.3 % 69.5 % 49.4 %
Mtoe = 11.63 TWh, Prim. energy includes energy losses

2012R = CO2 calculation criteria changed, numbers updated

Oil production[edit]

In June 2010 UAE had 6th top global proved oil reserves about 100 billion barrels, behind Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Iran, Iraq and Kuwait. The crude oil production of UAE was more than 4 and less than 5 million barrels daily.[1]

UAE was 4th top crude oil net exporter (108 Mt in 2008) and 10th top crude oil producers (120 Mt in 2009).[4]

Gas production[edit]

UAE has 7th top global proved natural gas reserves, above 6 trillion cubic metres. The global gas production in 2009 was 3 trillion cubic meters.[1]

Solar[edit]

The UAE has massive solar generation potential, and its energy policy has shifted substantially due to the declining price of solar. The Dubai Clean Energy Strategy aims to provide 7 per cent of Dubai’s energy from clean energy sources by 2020. It will increase this target to 25 per cent by 2030 and 75 per cent by 2050.[5]

Nuclear[edit]

Despite being a large oil exporter, the UAE is installing nuclear power plants to meet its energy needs.[6] It has signed an agreement with the U.S. on nuclear cooperation,[7] and is also a signatory to the nuclear non-proliferation treaty.[8]

Climate change[edit]

United Arab Emirates was 6th top carbon dioxide emitter per capita in the world in 2009: 40.31 tonnes per capita. Top countries were (tonnes/capita): Gibraltar 152, U.S. Virgin Islands 114, Qatar 80, Netherlands Antilles 51 and Bahrain 43.[9] All emissions from building and cement production are local but some people may argue that some United Arab Emirates produced fuels and/or goods are consumed abroad.[10] The UAE has begun acting aggressively to reduce its carbon emissions.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c 2011 report on oil and gas companies, Promoting revenue Transparency Transparency International 2011 p.113-114, 116 Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "TI2011" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  2. ^ IEA Key energy statistics 2011 Page: Country specific indicator numbers from page 48
  3. ^ IEA Key World Energy Statistics Statistics 2015, 2014 (2012R as in November 2015 + 2012 as in March 2014 is comparable to previous years statistical calculation criteria, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2006 IEA October, crude oil p.11, coal p. 13 gas p. 15
  4. ^ IEA Key statistics 2010
  5. ^ http://www.thenational.ae/business/energy/dubai-ruler-wants-solar-panels-on-every-roof-by-2030
  6. ^ "Nuclear Power in the United Arab Emirates". Country Briefings. World Nuclear Association (WNA). January 2011. Retrieved 2011-03-22. 
  7. ^ "US-UAE 123 Agreement". Retrieved 5 May 2010. 
  8. ^ "UAE NPT Signatory". Retrieved 5 May 2010. 
  9. ^ World carbon dioxide emissions data by country: China speeds ahead of the rest Guardian 31 January 2011
  10. ^ Which nations are most responsible for climate change? Guardian 21 April 2011