Engelmann Peak

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Engelmann Peak
Engelmann Peak viewed from Berthoud Pass, July 2016.jpg
Engelmann Peak viewed from Berthoud Pass
Highest point
Elevation13,368 ft (4,075 m) [1][2]
Prominence542 ft (165 m) [2]
Isolation1.74 mi (2.80 km) [2]
Parent peakBard Peak
Coordinates39°44′44″N 105°48′02″W / 39.7455426°N 105.8005636°W / 39.7455426; -105.8005636Coordinates: 39°44′44″N 105°48′02″W / 39.7455426°N 105.8005636°W / 39.7455426; -105.8005636[3]
Geography
Engelmann Peak is located in Colorado
Engelmann Peak
Engelmann Peak
LocationClear Creek County, Colorado, United States[3]
Parent rangeFront Range[2]
Topo mapUSGS 7.5' topographic map
Grays Peak, Colorado[3]

Engelmann Peak is a high mountain summit in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 13,368-foot (4,075 m) thirteener is located in Arapaho National Forest, 6.3 miles (10.2 km) west by south (bearing 261°) of the Town of Empire in Clear Creek County, Colorado, United States.[1][2][3] The mountain was named in honor of the botanist George Engelmann.[4]

The mountain is named for George Engelmann (1809-1884) a famous botanist responsible for describing and naming flora in the Rocky Mountains. He was born and educated in Germany and received his medical degree there. In 1832, he sailed to America. His financial backing had come from relatives in Germany who wanted him to invest in the lands of the new country so he explored areas in Illinois, Missouri and Arkansas.

Historical names[edit]

  • Cowles Mountain
  • Engelmann Peak – 1912 [3]
  • Englemann Peak

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b The elevation of Engelmann Peak includes an adjustment of +1.745 m (+5.73 ft) from NGVD 29 to NAVD 88.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Engelmann Peak, Colorado". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved November 5, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Engelmann Peak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved November 5, 2014.
  4. ^ White, Charles A. Memoir of George Engelmann. 1896. National Academy of Sciences (U.S.) Biographical Memoirs. volume 4. pages 1-22. see p. 19

External links[edit]