Engineering sample

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An Intel Xeon "Prestonia" engineering sample

Engineering samples are the beta versions of integrated circuits that are meant to be used for compatibility qualification or as demonstrators.[1] They are usually loaned to OEM manufacturers prior to the chip's commercial release to allow product development or display. Usually, they are picked out of a very large[quantify] batch and perform correctly. However, rarely they may have faults that were fixed in the production model.[citation needed]

Engineering samples are usually handed out under a non-disclosure agreement or an other type of confidentiality agreement.

Some engineering samples, such as Pentium 4 processors were rare and favoured[citation needed] for having unlocked base-clock multipliers. More recently[when?], Core 2 engineering samples have become more common and popular.[citation needed] Asian sellers were selling the Core 2 processors at major profit.[citation needed] Some engineering samples have been put through strenuous tests.[citation needed]

Engineering sample processors are also offered on a technical loan to some full-time employees at Intel, and are usually desktop extreme edition processors.[citation needed]

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