English College, Lisbon

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The English College, Lisbon (Portuguese Convento dos Inglesinhos) was a Roman Catholic seminary that existed from the 17th century to the 20th century.

Early history[edit]

In 1624 a college for English students wishing to study for the Catholic priesthood, and for mission work in England, was founded in Lisbon by Pedro Coutinho, a member of a prominent family.[1][2] It was known as SS. Peter and Paul's (with greater formality the Pontifical English College of Sts Peter and Paul - Lisbon). It was awarded the same rights and privileges as the English College, Rome[2] and was one of the Pontifical Colleges in the sense of being centrally controlled from Rome, one of the substantial group of institutions set up with the aim of maintaining the Catholic faith in England, Ireland, and Scotland.[3]

The moving force behind the foundation was the priest William Newman (1577–1640), though he never became head of the College.[4] Newman had been entrusted with property from the estate of the late Nicholas Ashton, a Catholic chaplain in Lisbon.[1] Initial progress was slow after a papal brief of Pope Gregory XV in 1622, with only a church erected on property given by Coutinho, who also gave endowment. Richard Smith, the Catholic bishop in England, took a hand and sent one of his archdeacons, Joseph Haynes (also Hynes, Harvey).[1] The foundation was supported by the arrival of group of students and teachers from the English College, Douai in 1628, the first president being Haynes.[5][6] Haynes, however, then died quite suddenly, shortly after the college opened in 1629.[1]

The second president was Thomas White, alias Blacklow, with William Clifford as vice-president. He was at the College for three years from 1630. His rules for its governance brought it under the Bishop of Chalcedon (the title used at the time by the Catholic bishop in England). Pursuing further funding and students in England, he was dissatisfied at the results and resigned.[7]

Later history[edit]

It suffered severely from the earthquake of 1755, but continued its work.[2] The College finally closed in 1973.[8]

People associated with the College[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d s:Historical account of Lisbon college/Chapter 1
  2. ^ a b c d Wikisource-logo.svg "Patriarchate of Lisbon". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 
  3. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "Pontifical Colleges". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 
  4. ^ Williams, Michael E. "Newman, William". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/67456.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  5. ^ a b Williams, Michael E. "Waring, Humphrey". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/8698.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  6. ^ http://brockworth.eu/EnglishCollegeLisbon.aspx
  7. ^ s:Historical account of Lisbon college/Chapter 2
  8. ^ http://conventodosinglesinhos.pt/index_en.html
  9. ^ http://www.adb.online.anu.edu.au/biogs/A030175b.htm
  10. ^ McConnell, Anita. "Booth, Edward". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/1431.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  11. ^ Murphy, G. Martin. "Bramston, James Yorke". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/3242.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  12. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "William Clifford". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 
  13. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "Daniel Fitter". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 
  14. ^ Whitehead, Maurice. "Gooden, Peter". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/10964.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  15. ^ Handley, Stuart. "Goter, John". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/11127.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  16. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "John Gother". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 
  17. ^ http://www.rcdow.org.uk/cardinal/default.asp?library_ref=1&content_ref=150
  18. ^ Bradley, G. "Hall, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/11991.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  19. ^ Hogg, James. "Hogg, James". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/11995.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  20. ^ Scragg, Brenda J. "Haydock, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/12748.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  21. ^ Hesketh, Roger. "Hesketh, Roger". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/13127.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  22. ^ Williams, Michael E. "Pickford, Edward". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/7113.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  23. ^ Machado de Sousa, M. Leonor. "Russell, Richard". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/75037.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  24. ^ Jordan, Ruth. "Tylden, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/10861.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  25. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "Thomas Godden". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 
  26. ^ Southgate, Beverley. "White, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/29274.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
Attribution

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Patriarchate of Lisbon". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.