Enid Terminal Grain Elevators Historic District

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Enid Terminal Grain Elevators Historic District
Grain Storage.JPG
LocationNorth 10th, North 16th, North Van Buren, and Willow Streets, Enid, Oklahoma
Built1925-1954
Architectural styleTerminal Grain Elevators[1]
NRHP reference No.09000239
Added to NRHP2009
Enid grain.jpg

The Enid Terminal Grain Elevators Historic District is located in Enid, Garfield County, Oklahoma and listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 2009.[1] The district consists of concrete grain elevators located between North 10th, North 16th, North Van Buren, and Willow Streets which have dotted the Enid skyline since the 1920s.

History[edit]

In 1938, during the Great Depression, Enid set a record of 14,185 train loads of wheat.[1] By April 1939, Enid was claiming the title of "Oklahoma’s Queen Wheat City."[1] By 1962, Garfield County's storage capacity was 75 million bushels, becoming the state of Oklahoma's main grain storage and handling center.[1] By 1970, the city claimed the title of Wheat Capital of the United States of America.[1]

The need for grain transportation has led to the continued improvement of Enid's infrastructure. In addition to being a grain storage hub, Enid was a rail hub for the Cherokee Outlet.[2] The first elevator built in Enid, the Enid Terminal Elevator, is located next to the Van Buren overpass next to Enid's main rail hub, five of the elevators are on the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad tracks or connecting lines in the north part of town, and U.S. Highway 64 runs in an east-west direction just to the south of Elevators Y and Z.

Enid hit its peak with a total grain storage capacity of 80,000,000 bushels in 1987.[1] The 1980 grain embargo instated by President Jimmy Carter, a poor economy, and drought lead to the closure of several of the elevators. In 1989, the Union Equity Co-Operative Exchange Elevators A and B and the Oklahoma Wheat Pool Terminal Elevator were shut down.[1] Enid continues to have the largest grain storage capacity in the United States and the third largest in the world.[3]

List of Grain Elevators[edit]

Name Year Built[1] Location[1] Architect[1] Capacity (million bushels)[1] Notes
Pillsbury Milling Elevator 1928 515 E. Birch 2.5
Enid Terminal Elevator 1925 1015 North Van Buren Street Jones-Hettelsater Construction Company of Kansas City, Missouri 2
Southwest Terminal Elevator 1926 1700 N. 10th Street 1 Also known as Feuquay and Salina Terminal Elevator.
General Mills Elevator 1929 1702 North 10th Street 2
Oklahoma Wheat Pool Terminal Elevator 1930, 1935 1801 North 16th Street Jones-Hettelsater Construction Company of Kansas City, Missouri 2.1 Also called the Farmers’ National Grain Corporation

Elevator and Continental Grain Company Elevator.

Union Equity Co-Operative Exchange Elevator A 1931 1801 N. 10th Street 7.6
Union Equity Co-Operative Exchange Elevator B 1946 1801 N. 10th Street Chalmers and

Borton Construction Company of Hutchinson, Kansas

11 This elevator was the first to be designed in the shape of a hexagon, which maximized storage space. E.N. Puckett, Union Equity general manager, received inspiration from a hotel's bathroom tile design.
Union Equity Co-Operative Exchange Elevator Z 1949–1951 Chalmers and

Borton Construction Company of Hutchinson, Kansas

15.3
Union Equity Co-Operative Exchange Elevator Y 1953–1954 16.3 In 1956 this was the largest conventional grain elevator in the world at the time of construction.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination for Enid Terminal Grain Elevators Historic District, #09000239 (PDF), National Park Service, 2009, archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-07-18
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-06-04. Retrieved 2010-05-02.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-07-29. Retrieved 2010-05-02.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)