Ensituximab

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Ensituximab
Monoclonal antibody
Type Whole antibody
Source Chimeric (mouse/human)
Target MUC5AC
Clinical data
ATC code
  • none
Identifiers
CAS Number
ChemSpider
  • none
UNII
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C6342H9800N1678O1985S46
Molar mass 142.8 kg/mol
 NYesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Ensituximab (NPC-1C) is a chimeric monoclonal antibody under development for as a candidate for treatment of cancers.[1] The target of the antibody is uncertain and is described as "human colorectal and pancreatic carcinoma-associated antigens", a set of tumor antigens isolated from human cancers.[2] The target might be Mucin 5AC.[3]

The antibody was discovered by scientists at Neogenix Oncology using tumor antigens that had been identified years earlier by Ariel Hollinshead; the founder of Neogenix had founded a prior company based on Hollinshead's work as well.[4] Neogenix worked with Selexis to develop the CHO cell line expressing ensituximab[5][6] and also worked with Goodwin Biotechnology Inc on process development.[7]

Ensituximab was granted orphan drug designation for pancreatic cancer by the FDA in 2010.[8] Results from a small Phase II trial in people with pancreatic or colon cancer presented in 2012 were not promising with regard to efficacy in treating pancreatic cancer.[3]

In 2011 Neogenix was forced to declare bankruptcy because the SEC opened an investigation into its use of unregistered broker-dealers in the course of raising $30M, and it could not raise further funds; in 2012 Neogenix sold its assets to a group of its investors who had formed a company called Precision Biologics.[9]

In 2016, Precision released data from a Phase II trial colorectal cancer and at that time was working with Cytovance Biologics as its contract manufacturing organization.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Statement On A Nonproprietary Name Adopted By The USAN Council: Ensituximab" (PDF). American Medical Association. 
  2. ^ "Ensituximab". NCI Drug Dictionary. Retrieved 31 January 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Strimpakos, Alexios S.; Syrigos, Kostas N.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif (10 March 2012). "Novel Agents in Early Phase Clinical Studies on Refractory Pancreatic Cancer". JOP. Journal of the Pancreas. 13 (2): 166–168. ISSN 1590-8577. PMID 22406592. 
  4. ^ Morrison, Trista (July 11, 2007). "Neogenix Uses Cancer Vaccine And Antibody Approaches". BioWorld Today. 
  5. ^ Neogenix Oncology, Inc. - Pharmaceuticals & healthcare - Deals and alliances profile. (2015). London: Global Data Ltd.
  6. ^ "Press ReleaseL Selexis and Neogenix Oncology Execute Commercial License Agreement - Selexis SA". Selexis SA. 5 January 2011. 
  7. ^ "From Vaccines To Monoclonal Antibodies: Creating Milestones In Cancer Theranostics". Frost & Sullivan. 14 September 2007. 
  8. ^ Staff (1 December 2010). "FDA Pipeline Preview, December 2010 (Ezogabine, Solesta, Dutasteride, Finasteride, Octaplex, SF1126, MP4CO, Ensituximab, Naloxone, CBLB502)". Formulary Journal. 
  9. ^ Davie, Alexander J. (5 October 2012). "Neogenix Oncology: A Good Case Study on Securities Law (Non)Compliance by a High Growth Company – Part 1: How It All Happened". Strictly Business. . "Neogenix Oncology: A Good Case Study on Securities Law (Non)Compliance by a High Growth Company – Part 2: What Neogenix Did". Strictly Business. 24 October 2012. . "Neogenix Oncology: A Good Case Study on Securities Law (Non)Compliance by a High Growth Company – Part 3: When the Genie Can’t Be Put Back in the Bottle". Strictly Business. 17 November 2012. 
  10. ^ "Ensituximab". AdisInsight. Retrieved 30 January 2017.