Entrepreneurial feminism

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Entrepreneurial feminism, developed from social feminism, is a theory that explains how feminist values are enacted through the venture creation process to improve the position of women in society.[1][2] Coined by Barbara Orser and Catherine Elliott, entrepreneurship is viewed as a mechanism to create economic self-sufficiency and equity-based outcomes for girls and women.[3][4] Entrepreneurial feminists enter commercial markets to create wealth and social change, based on the ethics of cooperation, equality, and mutual respect.[5]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Orser, B., Elliott, C., & Leck, J., 2011. Feminist attributes and entrepreneurial identity, Gender in Management: An International Journal, 26(8): 561-589.
  2. ^ Ahl, H., and Tillmar, M. (2015). Swedish welfare state retrenchment and the call for women’s entrepreneurship to fill the void. Paper presented at The 4th European Conference on Politics and Gender 2015 June 11-13 Uppsala, Sweden.
  3. ^ Yasmine, R. (2016). Entrepreneurial Feminism: Where Entrepreneurship Intersects Feminist Thinking. Whatsyourtech.ca. Accessed on August 19, 2016 at http://whatsyourtech.ca/2016/08/05/entrepreneurial-feminism-where-entrepreneurship-intersects-feminist-thinking/
  4. ^ Orser, B. & Elliott, C. (2015). Feminine Capital. Unlocking the Power of Women Entrepreneurs, Stanford University Press.
  5. ^ Orser, B., Elliott, C., & Leck, J., 2011. Feminist attributes and entrepreneurial identity, Gender in Management: An International Journal, 26(8): 561-589.