Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina

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Diocese of North Carolina
Diocese of North Carolina seal.jpg
Location
CountryUnited States
Ecclesiastical provinceProvince IV
Statistics
Congregations109
Members46,259 (2019)
Information
DenominationEpiscopal Church
EstablishedApril 24, 1817
Current leadership
BishopSamuel Sewall Rodman III
SuffraganAnne Hodges-Copple
Map
Location of the Diocese of North Carolina
Location of the Diocese of North Carolina
Website
www.episdionc.org

The Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina is a diocese of the Episcopal Church within Province IV that encompasses central North Carolina. Founded in 1817, the modern boundaries of the diocese roughly corresponds to the portion of North Carolina between I-77 in the west and I-95 in the east, including the most populous area of the state. Raleigh, Charlotte, Winston-Salem, Greensboro, and Durham are the largest cities in the diocese. The diocese originally covered the entirety of the state, until the Diocese of East Carolina which stretches to the Atlantic was formed in 1883, and the Diocese of Western North Carolina which lies to the west extending into the Appalachian Mountains was formed in 1922[a].

About the Diocese[edit]

The diocese has no cathedral[b], but its offices are located in the state capital of Raleigh. Representatives of the dioceses' 109 parishes meet annually at a diocesan convention in November. Between conventions, the diocese is administered by a Diocesan Council in conjunction with the diocesan staff who work under the bishop.

The current diocesan bishop is Samuel Sewall Rodman III. He was consecrated bishop on July 15, 2017, as the twelfth bishop of the Diocese of North Carolina, after the election of his predecessor, Michael Bruce Curry, as Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church.[4][5] The bishop suffragan of the diocese is Anne Hodges-Copple.[6]

Other bishops who have served the diocese since 1980 are Robert W. Estill (ninth bishop of the diocese), the late Robert C. Johnson (tenth bishop of the diocese), the late Frank Vest (suffragan bishop of the diocese who subsequently became bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Southern Virginia), the late Huntington Williams, Jr. (retired suffragan bishop), J. Gary Gloster (retired suffragan bishop), William Gregg (retired assistant bishop and previously the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Eastern Oregon), the late Alfred C. Marble, Jr. (retired assisting bishop and previously the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Mississippi), and Peter James Lee (formerly provisional bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of East Carolina and bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia).

Congregations in the diocese vary from conservative to liberal and from low church to high church, but the diocese itself is generally considered moderate and is highly supportive of the Episcopal Church. Consisting of approximately 48,000 communicants,[7] the diocese is the tenth-largest in the nation and has shown a 3% compound annual growth rate over the last ten years. The density of Episcopalians varies across the diocese but is highest in Wake County, the county of the state capital, Raleigh.

Programs and institutions[edit]

Principal programs of the diocese include campus ministries and social ministries:

The diocese no longer operates a camp and conference center, having sold its facility near Browns Summit, North Carolina to the State of North Carolina for use as Haw River State Park.[11] However, the diocese maintains an active youth program. The territory of the diocese includes independent schools with current or former diocesan affiliations including Trinity Episcopal School and Palisades Episcopal School in Charlotte, Canterbury School in Greensboro, and St. Mary's School and Ravenscroft School in Raleigh.

Other major institutions affiliated with the diocese are Penick Village in Southern Pines, a retirement community; and Thompson Child and Family Focus in Charlotte, a youth services ministry.


Bishops[edit]

Bishops of the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina[6][12]
From Until Name Title Notes
1823 1830 John Stark Ravenscroft 1st bishop of North Carolina
1831 1852 Levi Silliman Ives 2nd bishop of North Carolina
1853 1881 Thomas Atkinson 3rd bishop of North Carolina
1873 1881 Theodore B. Lyman Assistant bishop of North Carolina
1881 1893 4th bishop of North Carolina
1893 1893 Joseph Blount Cheshire Assistant bishop of North Carolina
1893 1932 5th bishop of North Carolina
1918 1928 Henry Beard Delany 1st bishop suffragan of North Carolina
1922 1932 Edwin Anderson Penick Bishop coadjutor of North Carolina
1932 1959 6th bishop of North Carolina
1951 1959 Richard Henry Baker Bishop coadjutor of North Carolina
1959 1965 7th bishop of North Carolina
1960 1965 Thomas Fraser Bishop coadjutor of North Carolina
1965 1983 8th bishop of North Carolina
1967 1975 Moultrie Moore 2nd bishop suffragan of North Carolina Bishop of Easton, (1975–1983)
1980 1982 Robert Whitridge Estill Bishop coadjutor of North Carolina
1983 1994 9th bishop of North Carolina
1985 1989 Frank Vest 3rd bishop suffragan of North Carolina Bishop of Southern Virginia (1991–1998)
1990 1996 Huntington Williams, Jr. 4th bishop suffragan of North Carolina
1994 2000 Robert C. Johnson Jr. 10th bishop of North Carolina
1996 2007 J. Gary Gloster 5th bishop suffragan of North Carolina
2000 2015 Michael Bruce Curry 11th bishop of North Carolina 27th Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church (2015 – Present)
2005 2013 Alfred C. "Chip" Marble, Jr. Assisting bishop of North Carolina Bishop of Mississippi (1993–2003)
2007 2013 William O. Gregg Assistant bishop of North Carolina Bishop of Eastern Oregon (2000–2007)
2013 Present Anne Hodges-Copple 6th bishop suffragan of North Carolina The first female bishop in the Diocese of North Carolina.
2015 2017 Bishop pro tempore of North Carolina
2015 2017 Peter Lee Assisting bishop of North Carolina[13] Bishop of Virginia (1985–2009); bishop provisional of East Carolina (2013–2015)

Lee was brought in as a temporary bishop of North Carolina after Bishop Michael Curry was called to serve as Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church. Lee served until Samuel S. Rodman, III was consecrated in April 2017.[14]

2017 Present Samuel S. Rodman, III 12th bishop of North Carolina

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ While the Diocese of Western North Carolina was not formed until 1922, the Diocese of North Carolina offered the territory of the western part of the state to the general Episcopal Church to act as a missionary district, and therefore did not manage the west after 1894.
  2. ^ The Church of the Good Shepherd in Raleigh was named the pro-cathedral of the diocese in the mid-1890s, but was never raised to full cathedral status at a diocesan convention. It has continued to perform many of the traditional functions of a cathedral in the years since.[1][2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A Memorial Church". The News and Observer. June 21, 1894. p. 4. Retrieved December 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD - The Silver Jubilee of the Church". The News and Observer. October 29, 1899. p. 14. Retrieved December 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Concerning the General Convention". The News and Observer. Oct 27, 1895. p. 8. Retrieved Feb 12, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ Sennott, Adam (March 4, 2017). "Massachusetts reverend elected Episcopal bishop of North Carolina". Boston Globe. Archived from the original on March 8, 2017.
  5. ^ "The Rev. Samuel Rodman Elected XII Bishop Diocesan of the Diocese of North Carolina". The Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. March 4, 2017. Archived from the original on April 11, 2017.
  6. ^ a b "The Bishops of North Carolina". The Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  7. ^ As announced by Curry at the Diocese's 2007 Convention
  8. ^ "Campus Ministry". The Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina.
  9. ^ "Our Ministry". Episcopal Farmworker Ministry.
  10. ^ "Hispanic / Latino Ministry". The Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina.
  11. ^ "History." History | NC State Parks, www.ncparks.gov/haw-river-state-park/history.
  12. ^ "Previous Bishops". The Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  13. ^ "Diocese of NC Welcomes the Rt. Rev. Peter Lee as Assisting Bishop". The Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. November 12, 2015. Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  14. ^ "Diocese of NC Welcomes the Rt. Rev. Peter Lee as Assisting Bishop." Diocesan House, www.dionc.org/dfc/newsdetail_2/3175359.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]