Epoca (magazine)

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Epoca
Margherita of Savoy-Aosta Epoca 1953.jpg
Former editorsAlberto Mondadori
Enzo Biagi
CategoriesCurrent affairs magazine
FrequencyWeekly
Year founded1950
First issue14 October 1950
Final issue1997
CompanyMondadori
Rizzoli Editori
CountryItaly
Based inMilan
LanguageItalian
ISSN0013-9718
OCLC number1718813

Epoca (meaning Age in English) was an Italian illustrated weekly current events magazine published in Milan, Italy.

History and profile[edit]

Copertina Epoca ottobre1950 Mondadori

Epoca was first published on 14 October 1950.[1][2][3] The magazine was modelled on Life[4][5] and Paris Match.[2] The magazine was part of Mondadori[3][6] and was based in Milan.[7]

Its first editor was Alberto Mondadori who was succeeded in the post by Enzo Biagi in 1953.[2] The magazine sold 500,000 copies in 1955.[2]

During the period until 1960 when Enzo Biagi edited Epoca the magazine covered current affairs news, social attitudes as well as TV news.[2] The magazine also included frequent and detailed articles about Hollywood stars of the period[8][9] and Italian movie stars such as Gina Lollobrigida.[10] The weekly had offices in New York, Paris and Tokyo.[5] From June 1952 to the late 1958 the Cuban-Italian writer Alba de Céspedes wrote an agony column, called Dalla parte di lei, in the magazine.[11]

Then Epoca became part of Rizzoli Editori[5] and began to cover travel and nature news with photographs and scientific articles.[2] The magazine had a section called I bei posti (meaning Beautiful Places in English) where the photographs of unknown places such as Bahamas, Marrakesh and Acapulco by Mario de Biasi, Alfredo Panucci and Giorgio Lotti were published.[4]

Epoca's circulation was 400,000 copies in 1963.[12] In 1970 the circulation of the magazine was 350,000 copies.[13] The weekly had a circulation of 120,046 copies in 1984.[14]

Epoca was closed down in 1997 due to low circulation.[2][7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1940s/1950s/Early 1960s Italian People's Magazines". Listal. Retrieved 5 December 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Gino Moliterno (11 September 2002). Encyclopedia of Contemporary Italian Culture. Routledge. p. 289. ISBN 978-1-134-75876-0. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
  3. ^ a b "Magazines". Mondadori. Retrieved 5 December 2014.
  4. ^ a b Angela Vettese (2012). "Italy in the Sixties: A Historical Glance". In Bernhard Mendes Bürgi. Arte Povera. The Great Awakening (PDF). Hatje Cantz. ISBN 978-3-7757-3357-1. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  5. ^ a b c Gabriella Ciampi de Claricini (February 1965). "Topical weeklies in Italy". International Communication Gazette. 11 (1): 12–26. Retrieved 25 April 2015.
  6. ^ "Time Inc in Joint Venture to Publish Italian Fortune". Associated Press. 7 November 1988. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  7. ^ a b "Epoca". Behance. Retrieved 5 December 2014.
  8. ^ Stephen Gundle (4 December 2000). Between Hollywood and Moscow: The Italian Communists and the Challenge of Mass Culture, 1943–1991. Duke University Press. p. 47. ISBN 0-8223-2563-2. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  9. ^ Stephen Gundle (Summer 2002). "Hollywood Glamour and Mass Consumption in Postwar Italy" (PDF). Journal of Cold War Studies. 4 (3). Retrieved 27 April 2015.
  10. ^ Réka C. V. Buckley (2000). "National Body: Gina Lollobrigida and the cult of the star in the 1950s". Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television. 20 (4). doi:10.1080/713669741.
  11. ^ Penny Morris (2004). "From private to public: Alba de Céspedes' agony column in 1950s Italy". Modern Italy. 9 (1): 11–20. doi:10.1080/13532940410001677467.
  12. ^ Randolp S. Churchill (17 January 1964). "The Press". The Spectator. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  13. ^ "The Press: Women, Not Girls". Time. 18 January 1971. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  14. ^ Maria Teresa Crisci. "Relationships between numbers of readers per copy and the characteristics of magazines" (PDF). The Print and Digital Research Forum. Retrieved 14 April 2015.