Epyc

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
AMD Epyc
AMD EPYC logo.png
Produced From June 2017 to present
Marketed by AMD
Designed by AMD
Common manufacturer(s)
Max. CPU clock rate 2.7 GHz to 3.2 GHz
Min. feature size 14 nm
Instruction set AMD64/x86-64, MMX(+), SSE1, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4a, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, AES, CLMUL, AVX, AVX2, FMA3, CVT16/F16C, ABM, BMI1, BMI2, SHA
Microarchitecture Zen (microarchitecture)
Cores up to 32 cores/64 threads (64 cores/128 threads on dual socket systems)
Core name(s)
  • Naples
Socket(s)
Predecessor Opteron
Brand name(s)
  • EPYC

Epyc is AMD's x86 server processor line based on the company's Zen microarchitecture. It was introduced in 2017.[1]

History[edit]

In March 2017 AMD announced a server platform based on the Zen microarchitecture, codenamed Naples, and officially revealed it under the brand name Epyc in May.[2] That June, AMD officially launched Epyc by releasing the Epyc 7000 series processors.[3]

Design[edit]

The platform includes one- and two-socket systems. In multi-processor configurations, two Epyc CPUs communicate via AMD's Infinity Fabric.[4] Each server chip supports 8 channels of memory and 128 PCIe 3.0 lanes, of which 64 lanes from each are used for CPU-to-CPU communication through Infinity Fabric when installed in a dual-processor configuration.[5] All Epyc processors are composed of four eight-core Zeppelin dies (the same die as found in Ryzen processors) in a multi-chip module, with the varying product core counts produced by symmetrically disabling cores of each core complex on each Zeppelin die.[6][7]

Reception[edit]

Initial reception to Epyc was generally positive.[8] Epyc was generally found to outperform Intel CPUs in cases where the cores could work independently, such as in high performance computing and big data applications. Epyc fell behind in database tasks compared to Intel's Xeon parts due to higher cache latency.[8]

Products[edit]

Server[edit]

Model Socket
Configu-
ration
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Memory Support TDP
(W)
Release
date
Release
price (USD)
Base Boost L2
(kB)
L3
(MB)
All Core Max
Epyc 7351P[9] [10][11] 1P 16 (32) 2.4 2.9 16 x 512 64 DDR4-2666
8 Channels
155/170 June 2017
[12]
0$750+
Epyc 7401P[9] [10][11] 24 (48) 2.0 2.8 3.0 24 x 512 64 155/170 $1075+
Epyc 7551P[9][10][11] 32 (64) 2.0 2.55 3.0 32 x 512 64 180 $2100+
Epyc 7251[9][10][11] 2P 8 (16) 2.1 2.9 8 x 512 32[9] DDR4-2400
8 Channels
120 0$475+
Epyc 7281[9][10][11] 16 (32) 2.1 2.7 2.7 16 x 512 32[9] DDR4-2666
8 Channels
155/170 0 $650+
Epyc 7301[9][10][11] 2.2 2.7 2.7 16 x 512 64 0 $800+
Epyc 7351[9][10][11] 2.4 2.9 16 x 512 64 $1100+
Epyc 7401[9][10][11] 24 (48) 2.0 2.8 3.0 24 x 512 64 DDR4-2666
8 Channels
155/170 $1850+
Epyc 7451[9][10][11] 2.3 2.9 3.2 24 x 512 180 $2400+
Epyc 7501[9][10][11] 32 (64) 2.0 2.6 3.0 32 x 512 64 DDR4-2666
8 Channels
155/170 $3400+
Epyc 7551[9][10][11] 2.0 2.55 3.0 32 x 512 180 $3400+
Epyc 7601[9][10][11] 2.2 2.7 3.2 32 x 512 180 $4200+


Embedded[edit]

In February 2018, AMD also announced the EPYC 3000 series of embedded Zen CPUs.[13]

Model Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Memory Support TDP
(W)
Release
date
Base Boost L2
(kB)
L3
(MB)
All Core Max
Epyc 3101 4 (4) 2.1 2.9 2.9 4 x 512 8 DDR4-2666
2 Channels
35 February 2018
Epyc 3151 4 (8) 2.7 2.9 2.9 4 x 512 16 45
Epyc 3201 8 (8) 1.5 3.1 3.1 8 x 512 16 DDR4-2133
2 Channels
30
Epyc 3251 8 (16) 2.5 3.1 3.1 8 x 512 DDR4-2666
2 Channels
50
Epyc 3301 12 (12) 2.0 2.15 3.0 12 x 512 32 DDR4-2666
4 Channels
65
Epyc 3351 12 (24) 1.9 2.75 3.0 12 x 512 80
Epyc 3401 16 (16) 1.85 2.25 3.0 16 x 512 32 85
Epyc 3451 16 (32) 2.15 2.45 3.0 16 x 512 100

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Computex 2017: AMD Press Event Live Blog (starts 10pm ET)". 
  2. ^ Kampman, Jeff (16 May 2017). "AMD's Naples datacenter CPUs will make an Epyc splash". Tech Report. Retrieved 16 May 2017. 
  3. ^ Cutress, Ian (20 June 2017). "AMD's Future in Servers: New 7000-Series CPUs Launched and EPYC Analysis". Anandtech. Retrieved 12 July 2017. 
  4. ^ Kampman, Jeff (7 March 2017). "AMD's Naples platform prepares to take Zen into the datacenter". Tech Report. Retrieved 7 March 2017. 
  5. ^ Cutress, Ian (7 March 2017). "AMD Prepares 32-Core Naples CPUs for 1P and 2P Servers: Coming in Q2". Anandtech. Retrieved 7 March 2017. 
  6. ^ https://www.pcper.com/reviews/Processors/AMD-EPYC-7000-Series-Data-Center-Processor-Launch-Gunning-Xeon/Architectural-Outl
  7. ^ https://www.nextplatform.com/2017/05/17/amd-disrupts-two-socket-server-status-quo/
  8. ^ a b De Gelas, Johan; Cutress, Ian (11 July 2017). "Sizing Up the Servers: Intel's Skylake-SP Xeon vs AMD's EPYC 7000". Anandtech. Retrieved 11 July 2017. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n https://www.amd.com/system/files/2017-06/AMD-EPYC-Data-Sheet.pdf Page 2
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Cutress, Ian (20 June 2017). "AMD's Future in Servers: New 7000-Series CPUs Launched and EPYC Analysis". Anandtech.com. Retrieved 21 June 2017. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Cutress, Ian (20 June 2017). "AMD EPYC Launch Event Live Blog". Anandtech.com. Retrieved 21 June 2017. 
  12. ^ Kennedy, Patrick (16 May 2017). "AMD EPYC New Details on the Emerging Server Platform". Serve the Home. Retrieved 16 May 2017. 
  13. ^ Alcorn, Paul (21 February 2018). "AMD Launches Ryzen Embedded V1000, EPYC Embedded 3000 Processors". tom's HARDWARE. Retrieved 5 April 2018.