Equality Utah

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Equality Utah
Equality Utah logo.png
Map of USA UT.svg
U.S. State of Utah
Founded 2001
Type Non-profit 501(c)(3)
Location
Area served
Utah
Key people
Troy Williams, Executive Director
Slogan Equal is right
Mission LGBT rights
Website equalityutah.org
Formerly called
Unity Utah (2001–2004)

Equality Utah is an American non-profit 501(c)(3) organization which is Utah's largest LGBT rights group based in Salt Lake City, Utah.[1] The organization is a member of the Equality Federation.[2][3]

History[edit]

It was founded in 2001 as Unity Utah and took its present name in 2004.[4]

In 2008, Equality Utah's Common Ground Initiative brought the group national attention.[1] During the campaigns for and against California's 2008 Proposition 8, leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) made statements that the LDS Church "does not object to rights for same-sex couples regarding hospitalization and medical care, fair housing and employment rights, or probate rights."[1] In response, on November 10, 2008, Equality Utah proposed a number of bills to the Utah State Legislature affording Utah citizens those rights[5] and asked the LDS Church to "stand by" those statements. On December 23, 2008, Human Rights Campaign representatives delivered twenty-seven-thousand letters asking the LDS Church to support those bills; the LDS Church declined to comment on the matter.[6][7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Johnson, Kirk (November 10, 2008). "Gay Leaders in Utah Plan 5-Bill Attack in Legislature". The New York Times. Retrieved December 24, 2008. 
  2. ^ "Community Partners". Equality Utah. Archived from the original on December 29, 2013. Retrieved January 17, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Member Organizations". Equality Federation. Retrieved January 14, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Equality Utah History". Archived from the original on 2010-04-14. Retrieved 2010-07-21. 
  5. ^ Press release (November 10, 2008). "Equality Utah Takes LDS Church at Its Word". (PDF format,27 kB). Accessed December 19, 2009.
  6. ^ Winters, Rosemary (December 23, 2008). "27,000 Letters Urge LDS leader to Back Rights of Gay Utahns". The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved December 24, 2008. 
  7. ^ Falk, Aaron (December 23, 2008). "Activists Hand-Deliver Letters to LDS Church". Deseret News. Retrieved December 19, 2009. 

External links[edit]